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Buyer’s Guide to John Deere E 100 Series Tractors

Buyer's Guide to John Deere E 100 Series Tractors

With the John Deere E 100 Series tractors, John Deere offers nine different models in ranges of 42, 48 on up to a 54-inch cut, with different features depending on the features you’re looking for. All the features are the John Deere quality that you expect from a company like John Deere.

The E100 is the only model in the John Deere E Series lineup that uses a CVT transmission. The CVT is continuously variable so it’s a mechanical transmission. Basically, just shift it in forward and push the pedal. The further you push to faster it goes. This is a more economical transmission and has a nice entry-level price point. 

The rest of the models in the John Deere E Series lineup have a hydrostatic transmission which is operated off two pedals. From the operator’s seat, you have a forward pedal. The further you push the faster it goes and the same goes for the reverse pedal. The further you push the faster it’ll back up. 

The John Deere E 100 Series tractors comes standard with a higher back seat. All the controls are community mounted up on the dash. There is and electric PTO clutch to engage the mower deck while the throttle and choke are all in one lever. The control handle off to the side is for your height of cut. It adjusts easily for less effort to the operator. 

These tractors also come standard with a cup holder and little glove compartment. They are all equipped with a Briggs and Stratton engine designed to John Deere specifications, but some of the engines have a large oil filter canister.  

The canister allows you to do a quick oil filter change. The oil is stored in the container and you just twist this filter off like you would on automotive filter. The oil is right in the cartridge and then you just replace with a new filter. There’s no drain plugs and no mess. The oil is stored right up in the cartridge so depending on the model you will find that quick change filter system on some of the tractors in the John Deere E Series lineup. 

As mentioned before, there are nine different tractor models in the John Deere E series. Some of the different features you’ll see are front bumpers, a larger seat with more support that is also adjustable to give you more support in your back. As you move up the line of John Deere E 100 Series tractors, you’ll notice larger front and rear tires to give you better traction or if you have rougher terrain it gives you a little nicer ride.

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How to Change the Spark Plug on a Lawn Mower

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Why Weingartz?

Weingartz, family owned and operated, began in 1945 as a farm supply store for local Michigan families. In the 1970s, we began to focus exclusively on outdoor power equipment. Over time, we morphed into the “power equipment superstore” that now defines all of our locations. The staff and experts at Weingartz work diligently to provide the best service possible and give honest and helpful advice to each and every customer.

Weingartz also sells parts for all outdoor power equipment at https://weingartz.com/parts-lookup.

Weingartz
39050 Grand River Ave. 
Farmington Hills, MI 48335
(248) 471-3050
info@weingartz.com

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Charles Deere: The Man Behind John Deere’s Commercial Success

The Man Behind John Deere's Commercial Success

Sure, you’ve heard of John Deere, the name behind the famous brand many have come to know and love. But do you know about the other Deere who was responsible for the company’s successful growth before and during the turn of the 20th century? That man, otherwise referred to as John Deere’s son, was better known as Charles Deere.

John Deere’s second son, Charles Deere, was born in 1837, the same year that John Deere created his trademark self-cleaning plow from an old steel saw blade. Although this coincidence may now seem like an omen to the contributions Charles Deere would one day make to the company, the Deere family did not initially plan for Charles to assume a management role. In fact, it was John Deere’s eldest son, Francis Albert, who planned to one day take over the family business. That all changed, however, when Francis unexpectedly died during a flu outbreak at age 18. Assuming his older brother’s role, Charles Deere attended business school and in 1854, began working at his father’s company.

A natural at bookkeeping, Charles Deere advanced quickly in managing the company’s finances and soon moved on to become head of sales. In this role, Charles combined his knack for business with an extensive knowledge of plows to demonstrate equipment and win over new customers.

After years of prosperity under Charles’ direction, the Deere business hit a rough patch during the “Panic of 1857.” During this time, many businesses faced economic hardship—and the Deere business was no exception. Faced with overspending in production and manufacturing costs, John Deere turned company leadership over to Charles, who used his know-how to guide finances in the right direction. This overhaul included reorganizing the business into a partnership called John Deere & Company, which John Deere and Charles Deere shared equally with colleagues Luke Hemenway and David Bugbee. This strategy allowed the Deeres to manage more money within the family, avoiding personal bankruptcy in the event that something should happen to the business.

To ensure future success of John Deere & Company, Charles Deere remained in a leadership role even though his father held on to the official title of company president. It was under Charles’ management that the company continued to prosper, giving birth to new branch houses across the country. Through his father’s death in 1886 until his own passing in 1907, Charles Deere also helped expand a product line that included over 300 models of plows and other various types of farm equipment. Today, Deere & Company continues to serve customers in agricultural and landscaping professions, providing quality products that deliver superior results.

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Why Weingartz?

Weingartz, family owned and operated, began in 1945 as a farm supply store for local Michigan families. In the 1970s, we began to focus exclusively on outdoor power equipment. Over time, we morphed into the “power equipment superstore” that now defines all of our locations. The staff and experts at Weingartz work diligently to provide the best service possible and give honest and helpful advice to each and every customer.

Weingartz also sells parts for all outdoor power equipment at https://weingartz.com/parts-lookup.

Weingartz
39050 Grand River Ave. 
Farmington Hills, MI 48335
(248) 471-3050
info@weingartz.com

Connect With Us!

https://plus.google.com

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https://twitter.com/Weingartz

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Fuel Recommendations for Snow Blowers

Fuel Recommendations for Snow Blowers

Your snow blower is designed to ensure years of hassle-free operation. Your snow blower’s fuel system is also designed for years of use. However, if you are not mindful of the fuel in your machine and allow it to go bad this can cause starting or running problems and damage to the fuel system. Read more as our experts explain how to avoid most fuel-related problems in your snow blower.

Fuel Recommendation #1 – Remove fuel from your snow blower for summer storage.

When you’re finished using your snow blower for the season, drain the fuel out of your machine. There may still be fuel in the fuel line and carburetor so start your blower and allow it to run until no fuel is left in the machine.

Make sure there is no old fuel resting in your snow blower. Old fuel left in your snow blower during the off-season will deteriorate and cause problems for your machine. Your blower may not start or run properly and, in some cases, there will be damage to the fuel system.

Fuel Recommendation #2 – Do not use gasoline containing more than 10% ethanol.

Gasoline containing higher levels of ethanol is corrosive and attracts water, which can cause starting or running problems and damage to your snow blower’s fuel system. Engines produced for use in outdoor power equipment are not designed for gasoline with more than 10% ethanol. Read your owner’s manual for information on the proper fuel to use in your snow blower.

Fuel Recommendation #3 – If you use your snow blower infrequently during the winter, add a fuel stabilizer to your fuel storage container.

Untreated gas left in your snow blower can deteriorate quickly, causing problems for your machine and the fuel system. By ensuring that the fuel in your snow blower is stabilized, you can minimize the chances of deterioration and damage.

Fuel Recommendation #4 – Store fuel properly.

Store your fuel in a clean, plastic, sealed container approved for fuel storage. This will help prevent rust and metallic contaminants from entering the fuel system. Close the vent, if equipped, when not in use and store the container away from direct sunlight. Fuel will deteriorate faster when exposed to air and sunlight.

If it takes longer than 30 days to use the fuel in the container, add a fuel stabilizer when you fill the container.

Using these fuel recommendations for snow blower is very important. If you do not use the proper fuel or allow old fuel to deteriorate, your machine will suffer. If you have questions or concerns about the fuel you’re using, feel free to contact us.

 

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Everyone Needs a Snow Blower: 8 Tips For Michiganders

5 Common Snow Blower Problems and Solutions

Why Weingartz?

Weingartz, family owned and operated, began in 1945 as a farm supply store for local Michigan families. In the 1970s, we began to focus exclusively on outdoor power equipment. Over time, we morphed into the “power equipment superstore” that now defines all of our locations. The staff and experts at Weingartz work diligently to provide the best service possible and give honest and helpful advice to each and every customer.

Weingartz also sells parts for all outdoor power equipment at https://weingartz.com/parts-lookup.

Weingartz
46061 Van Dyke Ave.
Utica, MI 48317
(586) 731-7240
info@weingartz.com

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Learn More About Brand Specific Snow Blowers

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Honda HSS Series Snow Blowers

Honda HSS Series Snow Blowers

Honda HSS Series Snow Blowers are offered in three different models, 24, 28 and 32 inch widths. All models are available with wheel drive or track drive. Wheel drive offers great traction and easy maneuverability on flatter areas. Track drive offers great traction as well and is useful when working on uneven surfaces, inclines and icy grounds.

All Honda HSS Series Snow Blowers have a heavy-duty serrated auger which breaks through tough snow and feeds it into the second stage impeller which allows the machine to throw snow, depending on conditions, up to 50 feet.

There is a control lever to engage the drive and one for the auger. With these levers, you can take one hand off to operate your chute control and still have the auger driving. These machines also have a joystick control, and this feature is something very unique to Honda HSS Series Snow Blowers. Your blower does need to be running to use the feature, and with it you can move your deflector chute up or down and control the directional change from right to left.

Another feature unique to Honda is the hydrostatic drive transmission, which is something you normally see on a lawn tractor. It’s a maintenance-free drive system with no clutching and no shifting. Move the lever forward or backward to go in the direction you want, at the speed you want. The further you push forward the faster your snow blower goes. To reverse, pull the lever back.

Honda HSS Series Snow Blowers have turning clutches. While using your machine, squeeze the left or right control levers to turn left or right. Though these machines are large, the control levers make maneuvering and transporting very easy.

All Honda HSS Series Snow Blowers come standard with an LED headlight that provides high visibility for users. Adjustable front skid shoes keep the blower from scraping the ground or tossing stones in the gravel. Skid shoes leaves behind a little bit of snow in order to protect your blower and concrete.

Honda HSS Series Snow Blowers are designed with commercial-grade Honda GX engines. Second to none in the industry, these are long-lasting and easy starting engines. They’re available in pull start and electric start models. Most electric start snow blowers on the market are 110 volts and need to be plugged into a wall but Honda has a 12-volt battery-powered system. You don’t have to plug it in, just tap the key to start. If the blower stalls, you just turn the key versus having to pull it back up to an extension cord. That’s a very nice and unique feature on Hondas that you don’t find on other two stage blowers.

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5 Common Snow Blower Problems and Solutions

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Why Weingartz?

Weingartz, family owned and operated, began in 1945 as a farm supply store for local Michigan families. In the 1970s, we began to focus exclusively on outdoor power equipment. Over time, we morphed into the “power equipment superstore” that now defines all of our locations. The staff and experts at Weingartz work diligently to provide the best service possible and give honest and helpful advice to each and every customer.

Weingartz
39050 Grand River Ave.
Farmington Hills, MI 48335
(248) 471-3050
info@weingartz.com

Connect With Us!

https://plus.google.com

https://www.facebook.com/WeingartzLawnToSnow

https://twitter.com/Weingartz

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Learn More About Brand Specific Snow Blowers

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How to Prepare Outdoor Plants for Cold Weather

How to Prepare Outdoor Plants for Cold Weather

When winter rolls around, people aren’t the only ones who need to be protected from the cold. Some outdoor plants need to be covered to ensure survival during the cold months. Fall is the best time to protect your plants from winter’s harsh weather. During the winter, plants are susceptible to foliar damage, winter scald, and frozen roots. In addition to prepping your outdoor power equipment for winter, make sure you prep your outdoor plants for cold weather with these plant protection tips.

Mulch

Applying a layer of mulch is one of the most effective ways to protect your plants in the winter. The mulch will act as an insulator and hold in heat and moisture in the soil to protect the roots of your plants from the cold weather.

Water plants

Make sure the soil is well-watered before the ground freezes. Wet soil prevents freeze injury to the roots of plants because moist soil traps heat better than dry soil. Don’t water frozen soil because this will not help protect them from the cold and can actually make things worse for the plant.

Cover plants and trees

The purpose of covering plants is to capture the earth’s heat and prevent cold winds from drying them out. To cover plants and trees in burlap, place a few wooden stakes around the plant, allowing a few inches of space between the stakes and the plant. Put a double layer of burlap over the stakes and secure it to the stakes with staples.

If your climate is mild or only includes occasional light frost, covering your plants with an old blanket may be enough. Similar to using burlap, you may want to use a few stakes to prop up the blanket, otherwise it can damage the plant.

Build a cold frame

Building a temporary cold frame or greenhouse will trap heat and block out frost. Though it requires a bit of construction, this is a great solution to keeping plants safe and warm during the winter.

To build a cold frame, bend slender metal rods into loops and stick the ends into the ground across a garden row. Place a length of row cover fabric over the loops to enclose the plant. For a more permanent cold frame, hinge a window or storm window to one side of an open-bottomed box built from scrap lumber.

Also consider building an inexpensive greenhouse to protect plants. Make sure your greenhouse receives proper ventilation. If daytime temperatures are warm, open the greenhouse to allow air to circulate. If you don’t, your plants could overheat or build up too much moisture inside.

Bring potted plants inside

This is the easiest solution to protecting plants from the cold. If you have any potted plants or hanging baskets, bring them indoors. Make sure you place these plants near windows to allow them to receive their required sunlight.

Temperatures are dropping so it’s no secret that winter is coming. Since plants are susceptible to damage in cold weather, make sure you protect them with shelter, water, and mulch this winter.

 

You May Also Enjoy These Articles:

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Snowblower Safety: 6 Tips For Homeowners

Why Weingartz?

Weingartz, family owned and operated, began in 1945 as a farm supply store for local Michigan families. In the 1970s, we began to focus exclusively on outdoor power equipment. Over time, we morphed into the “power equipment superstore” that now defines all of our locations. The staff and experts at Weingartz work diligently to provide the best service possible and give honest and helpful advice to each and every customer.

Weingartz
11875 Northland Dr.
Cedar Springs, MI 49319
(616) 696-2913
info@weingartz.com

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Convert Your Tractor Into a Snow Blower

Convert Your Tractor Into a Snow Blower

We know many of you dread clearing snow during the winter. We also know that maneuvering your shovel or snow blower through heavy, wet snow can be exhausting. If you own a tractor, you have an alternative way to remove snow this year.  You can convert your tractor into a snow blower, avoiding the need to shovel or purchase a snow blower. Our experts explain what you need to convert your tractor into a snow blower this winter.

Attachments and accessories vary by model. Refer to your owner’s manual or contact us for information on attachment and accessory compatibility.

Snow blower attachment

To convert your tractor into a snow blower, you need a snow blower attachment to remove the snow from your drive and walkways. These attachments have the capacity to handle big snow removal jobs and work well in all snow conditions.

With this attachment, all you need to do is start up your tractor, get on, and let it do all the heavy lifting.

Plow blade attachment

If you prefer to push snow instead of throw it, there is an assortment of tractor mounted plows to help clear snow from your driveway. Plow blades get closer to the pavement than blowers, leaving you with little to no snow on your pathways.

Tire chains

When using your tractor in the snow, your tractor tires may not have the stability and traction needed to remove snow. When the pavement is covered by snow or is icy, you can increase the traction by using tractor tire chains.

Tire chains are also beneficial when working on steep terrain and narrow roads. To maintain traction, make sure you have tire chains on your tires. They will make your snow removal tasks safer and more productive.

Wheel weights

Similar to tire chains, wheel weights provide extra traction when working on snowy or icy terrain. Weight wheels are also recommended when adding attachments to the front of your tractor. Apply these wheels to the rear tires to help weigh down the back end of your machine and press down so the tires grip better.

For even better traction you can apply both tire chains and wheel weights to your mower.

Cast-iron weights

Cast-iron weights are a great accessory when it comes to adding attachments to the front end of your tractor. These weights counterbalance heavy attachments and provide better traction and stability.

Some tractors have built-in front and/or rear weight brackets to hang the cast-iron weights on. Other tractors require a weight bracket. Refer to your owner’s manual to determine what your tractor has and/or needs.

 Snow cab

In addition to snow, winter brings freezing temps and harsh winds so add a snow cab to your tractor for extra protection from these elements.

It’s important to know your options when it comes to snow removal. Consider converting your tractor into a snow blower this year because it’s a great alternative to shoveling and snow blowing. With these attachments and accessories you can work comfortably and efficiently, while remaining protected from the frigid cold.

If you need help selecting the right attachments and accessories for your tractor, feel free to contact us.

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Why Weingartz?

Weingartz, family owned and operated, began in 1945 as a farm supply store for local Michigan families. In the 1970s, we began to focus exclusively on outdoor power equipment. Over time, we morphed into the “power equipment superstore” that now defines all of our locations. The staff and experts at Weingartz work diligently to provide the best service possible and give honest and helpful advice to each and every customer.

Weingartz
39050 Grand River Ave.
Farmington Hills, MI 48335
(248) 471-3050
info@weingartz.com

Connect With Us!

https://plus.google.com

https://www.facebook.com/WeingartzLawnToSnow

https://twitter.com/Weingartz

http://pinterest.com/MrWeingartz

Learn More About Brand Specific Snow Blowers

6 Snow Blower Maintenance Tips - Honda-Snow-Blowers-Page6 Snow Blower Maintenance Tips - Toro-Snow-Blowers-Page6 Snow Blower Maintenance Tips - Cub-Cadet-Snow-Blowers-Page

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How to Replace the Auger Belt on a Single Stage Snow Blower

How-to-Replace-the-Auger-Belt-on-a-Snow-Blower - Featured Image

Winter is coming and you need to start preparing for it now. Now is the perfect time to break out your snow blower and inspect it for issues that need repair before snow hits the ground. Some issues, such as a damaged blade or auger belt, will prevent your machine from properly removing snow. A snow blower that cannot remove snow is essentially useless so use this guide to help  you replace the auger belt on your machine and avoid being buried in inches of snow when winter is here.

Safety Precautions – Before performing any repair or maintenance on your Toro single stage snow blower:

  • Shut off the snow blower engine
  • Allow the engine to become cool to the touch
  • Disconnect the spark plug lead wire from the engine to prevent accidental starting

Tools you’ll need:

  • Socket
  • Ratchet
  • Electric drill (optional)
  • Brush
  • New belt

Here’s what to do:

The auger belt is located behind the auger cover; therefore you’ll need to remove the cover. Remove the bolts that are holding the belt cover on using a socket and ratchet or an electric drill. Once the bolts are removed, take the auger cover off.

Remove the old belt and use a brush to clean out any belt shavings. Put the new belt onto the breaking mechanism. Place the belt around the auger drive pulley. Pull the idler down and go around the plastic bushing that is a part of the braking system on auger. Lastly, place the new belt around the engine belt.

Ensure that the new belt is on firmly. If the belt is too loose, it will need to be adjusted. Locate the adjustment cable.

Remove the cable from the handle and remove the cover from the bracket. Remove the cable from the current hole and move it down a couple of holes. Put the cover back over the bracket and slide the cable back into the handle.

After you properly tension the cable, replace the belt cover and bolts. Lastly, reattach the engine spark plug wire.

Just as your motor vehicle needs regular maintenance and upkeep, so does your snow blower. Occasionally your snow blower will have an issue that a pre-snow tune-up or end-of season repair won’t fix. It’s normal for your machine to have a hiccup every now and again but remember, where there’s a problem, there’s also a solution.

If you prefer not to perform any snow blower maintenance yourself, bring it to us and we’ll perform the speedy repair.

You May Also Enjoy These Articles:

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5 Common Snow Blower Problems and Solutions

How to Replace Snow Blower Paddles and Scraper Bars

 

Why Weingartz?

Weingartz, family owned and operated, began in 1945 as a farm supply store for local Michigan families. In the 1970s, we began to focus exclusively on outdoor power equipment. Over time, we morphed into the “power equipment superstore” that now defines all of our locations. The staff and experts at Weingartz work diligently to provide the best service possible and give honest and helpful advice to each and every customer.

Weingartz also sells parts for all outdoor power equipment at https://weingartz.com/parts-lookup.

Weingartz
5436 Jackson Rd.
Ann Arbor, MI 48103
(734) 239-8200
info@weingartz.com

Connect With Us!

https://plus.google.com

https://www.facebook.com/WeingartzLawnToSnow

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Learn More About Brand Specific Snow Blowers

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Be Prepared for Storms – How to Choose a Generator

Be-Prepared-For-Storms-How-to-Choose-a-Generator - Featured Image

In the last few years we’ve had at least one major ice storm every winter or spring that has wreaked havoc with our electrical supplies. When these storms occur, our generator business picks up significantly, but many people are forced to make quick decisions in the interest of protecting their homes and belongings. Having the right generator handy can make all the difference so before you have an urgent need to invest in a backup power system, here are some things to consider while you have time, so that you feel comfortable with your decision.

Generator Tip 1 – Determine your power requirements.

Typical priorities include the sump pump, furnace and refrigerator/freezer. Power failure of these things creates more than an inconvenience. It can cause very costly problems within your home. Other items like ventilators, well pumps, lights and televisions should also be considered – either for necessity or convenience.

It is important to realize that products with electric motors generally take about three times the amount of power to start up as they do to run, so be sure your backup source can handle the starting requirements.

Generator Tip 2 – Decide whether you want to run multiple items at once or if you will switch from one item to another.

More powerful generators can handle most of the essentials of your home without switching from circuit to circuit. A smaller generator will require some manual work on your part, but will still be able to run most items individually.

If you choose to use a larger generator for convenience, a good rule of thumb for calculating size is to add the start-up wattage for the two highest-requirement appliances and the running wattage of everything else that you want to run simultaneously. This will give you a number that you can be confident won’t trip the circuit breaker.

Generator Tip 3 – Consider which type of generator best fits your circumstances.

Portable generators are relatively low-cost and can be transported to multiple locations (you can help out your friends and family when they are in a bind – or use it on a camping trip). Wattages of these units vary from 1000 to 6500 watts. This is usually powerful enough to run almost everything in a typical home.

Home standby units are stationary units that are more expensive, but offer the convenience of running on natural gas. They are generally available in higher wattages than portable generators and can power your entire home, including central air conditioning units.

Generator Tip 4 – Noise level.

In addition to factors such as size, portability, run time, low oil warnings, etc., the most sought-after feature in a generator is unquestionably sound level. The nature of most power outages requires that your generator run all night long, so the noise level is a real consideration. After all, it’s not very satisfying to spend hard-earned money on a generator and then have it keep you (and your neighbors from two streets over) up all night. Quietness is most often near the top of the list of features to consider.

Generator Tip 5 – How to connect the generator to the items that need power?

There are only two safe ways to provide power from a generator: use high quality extension cords or install a transfer switch. The extension cord option is self explanatory; just make sure to use heavy gauge extension cords, especially if it is a long distance from the generator to the appliance. It is important to note that the only safe way to connect a generator directly to your home electrical system is through a transfer switch.

Generator Tip 6 – Do not back-feed.

People ask us about back-feeding power through their home and we strongly urge customers not to do that. It is dangerous to power line workers, can damage the generator and can cause fires. It’s just not worth the risk, regardless of the precautions that you take, to back-feed power from a generator.

A transfer switch isolates the generator’s power from these hazards and creates a convenient way to switch from line power to generator power. While someone with basic electrical skills can figure out how to install a transfer switch, a licensed electrician is highly recommended.

Our salespeople are experts in helping customers make educated decisions about the generator that is right for them. Stop in or give us a call and we can help you through the process.

 

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6 Ways to Prepare For Winter Storm

Why Weingartz?

Weingartz, family owned and operated, began in 1945 as a farm supply store for local Michigan families. In the 1970s, we began to focus exclusively on outdoor power equipment. Over time, we morphed into the “power equipment superstore” that now defines all of our locations. The staff and experts at Weingartz work diligently to provide the best service possible and give honest and helpful advice to each and every customer.

Weingartz also sells parts for all outdoor power equipment at https://weingartz.com/parts-lookup.

Weingartz
6585 Dixie Hwy.
Clarkston, MI 48346
(248) 620-5258
info@weingartz.com

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Learn More About Specific Honda Generator Models

Generator Operation and Safety Tips - EG Honda Generators Generator Operation and Safety Tips - EU Honda Generators Generator Operation and Safety Tips - EB Honda Generators Generator Operation and Safety Tips - EM Honda Generators


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    Shop Parts - Be Prepared for Storms - How to Choose a Generator    Shop Equipment - Be Prepared for Storms - How to Choose a Generator

Is Your Generator Ready For a Power Outage?

Is-Your-Generator-Ready-For-a-Power-Outage - Featured Image

As we all know, when winter is upon us the temperatures get worse before they get any better.  With ice and snow building up on the power lines it’s no surprise when we experience a power outage.  The question you have to ask yourself is “Is my generator ready for a power outage?”

With that in mind there are a couple simple things you can do to make sure that your generator will function properly during an outage.

The first step is a simple one and should be done throughout the year on a monthly basis. Run your generator for at least 30 minutes each month to ensure the machine starts and runs. It will also allow you to determine whether or not your generator houses good fuel.

Remember, gasoline has a shelf life of between 30 and 60 days. If gasoline has sat in your generator longer than that you may encounter a problem.

There is nothing worse for a generator than sitting around with old fuel inside. This can cause a varnish build up in the carburetor which in turn will clog fuel ports, damage seals and cause the machine to run poorly if it runs at all.

The second simple step is to change your oil when the season changes.  As it gets colder out, you want to use lighter weight oil which offers less resistance for the crankshaft to move through which makes it easier for the generator to start. We suggest a 10w30 in the summer and a 5w30 in the winter.  It will take less of a toll on your battery if you utilize lighter weight oil.

Another note for winter use is to remove the air filter, leaving the cover on, if the temperature drops below 32 degrees. This part is not needed for the winter months due to the fact that there is little to no airborne debris. Generally they freeze and don’t allow the proper amount of air to get into the generator.

There you have it, a couple simple ways to keep your generator up and running.  With this bit of information, you should be able to have an early warning system if there is a potential problem with your machine.

Now you won’t be wondering “is my generator ready for a power outage?”  Instead you’ll have the comfort of knowing you are prepared.

You May Also Enjoy These Articles:

Be Prepared for Storms – How to Choose a Generator

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6 Ways to Prepare For Winter Storm

Buyer’s Guide to a Portable Generator

Common Generator Mistakes

Convert Amps To Watts For Generator Use

Why Weingartz?

Weingartz, family owned and operated, began in 1945 as a farm supply store for local Michigan families. In the 1970s, we began to focus exclusively on outdoor power equipment. Over time, we morphed into the “power equipment superstore” that now defines all of our locations. The staff and experts at Weingartz work diligently to provide the best service possible and give honest and helpful advice to each and every customer.

Weingartz also sells parts for all outdoor power equipment at https://weingartz.com/parts-lookup.

Weingartz
6585 Dixie Hwy.
Clarkston, MI 48346
(248) 620-5258
info@weingartz.com

Connect With Us!

https://plus.google.com

https://www.facebook.com/WeingartzLawnToSnow

https://twitter.com/Weingartz

http://pinterest.com/MrWeingartz

Learn More About Specific Honda Generator Models

Generator Operation and Safety Tips - EG Honda Generators Generator Operation and Safety Tips - EU Honda Generators Generator Operation and Safety Tips - EB Honda Generators Generator Operation and Safety Tips - EM Honda Generators

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Snow Blower Safety

Snow Blower Safety

The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission estimates that each year, on average, there are approximately 5,700 hospital emergency room related injuries associated with snow blowers. By sharing these tips we can minimize injuries to have a safe and happy season.

Safety Tip #1 - Read and understand your operator’s manual before each season or use.

Safety Tip #2 - Check all safety features and make sure they are intact. If a guard, shield or safety device including warning decals are illegible, missing or lost. Repair or replace them before use.

Safety Tip #3 - When using an electric snow blower, use an outdoor power cord and an outlet that has a ground-fault-circuit interruption protection. Always know where the power cord is at all times, and be sure to replace worn or damaged power cords.

Safety Tip #4 - Inspect the area where the snow blower will be used, remove any objects that might be picked up and thrown by the snow blower. Newspaper, dog chains and Christmas lights are very common items to be picked up by snow blowers and thrown, even becoming clogged in the snow blower.

Safety Tip #5 - Stay behind the handles of your snow blower. Keep your face, hands, feet, or any parts of your body, even clothing, away from the moving-rotating parts. Before leaving the operating position, if the unit becomes clogged, turn the engine off on a gas powered machine or unplug the electrical cord on an electric power snow blower. Wait for all moving parts to come to a complete stop, and then use a (snow clean-out tool), never use your hands or feet to remove a clog.

Safety Tip #6 - Keep children and pets far away when the snow blower is in use.

Safety Tip #7 - Do not touch the engine while it is running or soon after it is shut off, you could burn yourself. Make sure the snow blower is outdoors and cooled down before you add gasoline to the engine.

Safety Tip #8 - Never run your gasoline snow blower in a enclosed area, exhaust fumes are very dangerous.

Safety Tip #9 - Before adjusting, cleaning, inspecting, troubleshooting or repairing your snow blower, stop the engine and remove the key. For gasoline units, disconnect the spark plug wire and keep it away from the spark plug to prevent you from accidentally starting the engine while performing the needed repairs.

Safety Tip #10 - Perform only those maintenance instructions described in your operation manual and the ones you are comfortable performing. For all other repairs, contact your authorized service dealer.

 

You May Also Enjoy These Articles:

Snow Blower Buyer’s Guide

6 Snow Blower Maintenance Tips

Key Differences Between Snow Blowers

Everyone Needs a Snow Blowers: 8 Tips For Michiganders

5 Common Snow Blower Problems and Solutions

6 Ways to Prepare For Winter Storm

Why Weingartz?

Weingartz, family owned and operated, began in 1945 as a farm supply store for local Michigan families. In the 1970s, we began to focus exclusively on outdoor power equipment. Over time, we morphed into the “power equipment superstore” that now defines all of our locations. The staff and experts at Weingartz work diligently to provide the best service possible and give honest and helpful advice to each and every customer.

Weingartz
39050 Grand River Ave.
Farmington Hills, MI 48335
(248) 471-3050
info@weingartz.com

Connect With Us!

https://plus.google.com

https://www.facebook.com/WeingartzLawnToSnow

https://twitter.com/Weingartz

http://pinterest.com/MrWeingartz

Learn More About Brand Specific Snow Blowers

6 Snow Blower Maintenance Tips - Honda-Snow-Blowers-Page6 Snow Blower Maintenance Tips - Toro-Snow-Blowers-Page6 Snow Blower Maintenance Tips - Cub-Cadet-Snow-Blowers-Page

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