Expert Advice

Quick Model Guide Lookup

8 Best Practices for Effective Mowing

8-Best-Practices-for-Effective-Mowing - Featured Image

During the spring and summer we experience longer, warmer days, and ultimately, more time spent mowing the yard. You know that maintaining a well-kept and healthy lawn is important, but do you know the best way to mow to keep your lawn in mint condition? You can lessen your yard work time by utilizing these practices for effective mowing.

Mowing Tip #1 – Take care of your mower

Don’t attempt to mow the lawn if your mower is not in good shape. Make sure any maintenance or repairs have been performed, and make sure your mower has sharp blades. Dull blades are an ineffective way to mow and they can damage your lawn.

Mowing Tip #2 – Clear debris before mowing

Before cutting the grass, remove debris like small bits of trash and sticks from your yard. Anything that is too big for your mower to mulch will cause problems for the mower and even create safety hazards.

Mowing Tip #3 – Mow in the morning

It’s not a necessity, but it is recommended to mow earlier in the day. It’s better for your grass and the cooler temperatures are better for you.

Mowing Tip #4 – Choose the correct mowing height

Be mindful of how low you cut the grass. It’s best to remove no more than 1/3 of height of your grass when mowing. Grass struggles to recover when you cut off more than a third of its height in a single mowing. Continuous short mowings will weaken your lawn and leave room for weeds to grow.

Mowing Tip #5 – Do not mow wet grass

Sunshine and rain are good for your lawn as they keep it healthy and promote grass growth. However, it’s a bad idea to mow the lawn after it rains because wet grass can cause clumping and ruts. Mowing wet grass also leaves your lawn more vulnerable to certain diseases.

Mowing Tip #6 – Change directions when mowing

Alternate your mowing pattern to prevent lawn damage. The pattern change will control coarse grass and create even surfaces. Ultimately, different patterns promote a healthy lawn, and additionally, add an aesthetically pleasing design.

Mowing Tip #7 – Keep grass clippings

Allowing grass clippings to stay on your lawn after mowing allows nutrients to return to the soil. Consider blowing grass clippings back onto your lawn after mowing. This keeps them off your drive and walkways, and off your neighbor’s property.  This also gives your yard a neat, manicured look.

Mowing Tip #8 – Call on the pros

Lawn care professionals have the knowledge and skills to keep your lawn beautiful and healthy. If you find yourself with questions or come across an issue that doesn’t fit your regular lawn maintenance routine, don’t hesitate to call on the pros.

 

You May Also Enjoy These Articles:

How to Maintain the Perfect Lawn

Essential Equipment for Lawn Maintenance

When to Sharpen or Replace Your Lawn Mower Blade

Buyer’s Guide to Walk Behind Lawn Mowers

5 Lawn Mower Tune-up Tips for Spring

Why Weingartz?

Weingartz, family owned and operated, began in 1945 as a farm supply store for local Michigan families. In the 1970s, we began to focus exclusively on outdoor power equipment. Over time, we morphed into the “power equipment superstore” that now defines all of our locations. The staff and experts at Weingartz work diligently to provide the best service possible and give honest and helpful advice to each and every customer.

Weingartz also sells parts for all outdoor power equipment at https://weingartz.com/parts-lookup.

Weingartz
5436 Jackson Rd.
Ann Arbor, MI 48103
(734) 239-8200
info@weingartz.com

Connect With Us!

https://plus.google.com

https://www.facebook.com/WeingartzLawnToSnow

https://twitter.com/Weingartz

http://pinterest.com/MrWeingartz

Learn More About Brand Specific Lawn Mowers

Cub-Cadet-Lawn-Mowers-ButtonHonda-Lawn-Mowers-ButtonToro-Lawn-Mowers-button

 

Sign up for our electronic monthly newsletter for discounts and money-saving tips.

    Snow Blower Buyers Guide - Shop Illustrated Diagrams   ShopEquipment

5 Lawn Mower Tune Up Tips For Spring

5 Lawn Mower Tune-Up Tips for Spring

After a long, cold winter, there’s no doubt that many people are breathing a collective sigh of relief as we greet spring. With this change in season comes warmer days, and ultimately, more time spent mowing the yard. For effective mowing, don’t let common mishaps such as clogged air filters, fouled spark plugs, or flooded carburetors stand in your way—instead, prevent these and other potential problems with our simple lawn mower tune up checklist, outlined below.


Lawn Mower Tune Up Tip #1: Dispose of Old Fuel & Change Oil

If you didn’t empty your fuel tank before storing your lawn mower for the winter, now is the time to do so. Failing to dispose of old gasoline can lead to a clogged carburetor and overall degraded mowing performance (click here to learn more about draining fuel from your small engine equipment). Remember to use mid-grade fuel that has been stored in a tightly-sealed container, with no higher than an E10 ethanol level. Higher ethanol levels can also contribute to build-up problems, leaving another problem on your hands. In addition, take this time to change the oil, which will increase engine life and overall performance.


Lawn Mower Tune Up Tip #2: Check the Air Filter

Figuring out when it’s time to replace your air filter is simple. After removing the filter from your mower, tap to remove any loose debris, then hold it up to the light. If you can see light shining through the filter, it is okay to reuse. If you cannot see light through the filter, it is dirty and needs to be changed (click here to shop all air filters).


Lawn Mower Tune Up Tip #3: Change Spark Plug

If it has been over a year since you last replaced your spark plug, take this time to stay up-to-date. For how-to-instructions, click here.


Lawn Mower Tune Up Tip #4: Sharpen Dull Blades

Sharp lawn mower blades can make all of the difference when cutting your lawn. To keep your grass healthy, inspect your lawn mower blades for any chips, dents, or thinning. Click here for more details on blade sharpening.


Lawn Mower Tune Up Tip #5: Check Bolts, Wheels, Cables, & Belts

Last, but not least, make sure to tighten all bolts and check wheels, cables, and belts to make sure they’re not overly-worn. Keeping an eye on all lawn mower parts before you get too busy with mowing can be a big help in avoiding problems later on in the season.

For more lawn mower tune up tips, watch the video below or contact us here.

 

You May Also Enjoy These Articles:

Buyer’s Guide to Walk Behind Lawn Mowers

How to Maintain the Perfect Lawn

Engine Oil Maintenance

When to Sharpen or Replace Your Lawn Mower Blade

How to Store Small Engine Equipment for Winter

Lawn Mower Maintenance

Why Weingartz?

Weingartz, family owned and operated, began in 1945 as a farm supply store for local Michigan families. In the 1970s, we began to focus exclusively on outdoor power equipment. Over time, we morphed into the “power equipment superstore” that now defines all of our locations. The staff and experts at Weingartz work diligently to provide the best service possible and give honest and helpful advice to each and every customer.

Weingartz also sells parts for all outdoor power equipment at https://weingartz.com/parts-lookup.

Weingartz
11875 Northland Dr.
Cedar Springs, MI 49319
(616) 696-2913
info@weingartz.com

Connect With Us!

https://plus.google.com

https://www.facebook.com/WeingartzLawnToSnow

https://twitter.com/Weingartz

http://pinterest.com/MrWeingartz

Sign up for our electronic monthly newsletter for discounts and money-saving tips.

     ShopParts-How-to-Prune-and-Care-for-Trees   Shop Equipment

3 Signs You Need to Sharpen or Replace Your Mower Blade

When to replace your mower blade

To achieve a great cut and a healthy lawn, it is essential to regularly sharpen or replace your lawn mower blade. Generally, one good sharpening at the start and one around the middle of mowing season should suffice until you store your mower for the winter (click here for tips on storing small engine equipment). If your mower picks up any stray debris throughout the season, however (sticks, caps, etc.), it is wise to schedule additional sharpening as needed. The exact timing depends on workload, but there are a few tell-tale signs that will help you stay on schedule. With the following tricks, you can develop a trained eye and keep your lawn mower blade up to par all season.

1.  The first and most obvious thing to look for is unevenness in your lawn. When your lawn mower blade is sharp, your grass should be cut at the same height every time with just one pass of the mower. If you find yourself making multiple passes to compensate for missed patches of grass, a dull blade may be the culprit.

2.  Another way to tell if your lawn mower blade needs sharpening is by closely inspecting the grass. If you notice that the tip of each grass blade is torn and not cleanly-sliced, it may be time to switch out your blade. Torn tips may also decrease grass health, causing grass to lose its lush, green color to an unhealthy shade of brown.

3.  Lastly—and perhaps most obviously—you can inspect the blade itself. While your lawn mower blade can usually be salvaged with routine sharpening, it is important to look for large chips or dents in the cutting edge that cannot be smoothed out. Inconsistencies in the blade are likely to tear grass rather than delivering the clean cut that’s important for your lawn. Also pay attention to the thickness of your lawn mower blade. Over time, sand, dirt, and other yard debris can erode the blade, causing the metal to weaken and become paper-thin. If you notice this, replace the blade immediately to avoid breakage during mowing, which can cause pieces of metal to fly apart and possibly injure you or other bystanders.

Overall, paying close attention to your lawn and your mower will help greatly in determining when to sharpen or your replace your lawn mower blade. Remember the signs, perform maintenance regularly, and your lawn mower blade should cut beautifully every time you mow.

 

Lawn Mower Blade Sharpening - Shop Weingartz.com   Lawn Mower Blade Sharpening - Shop Parts by Illustrated Diagram

You May Also Enjoy These Articles:

Types of Lawn Mower Blades

Mower Maintenance

Lawn Mower Maintenance

About Weingartz

For over 65 years, Weingartz has been the trusted North American leader in sales, parts, and service of outdoor power equipment. A family-owned and operated business, Weingartz continues to serve commercial and residential buyers across Michigan and online at www.weingartz.com.

Weingartz
39050 Grand River Ave.
Farmington Hills, MI 48335
(248) 471-3050
info@weingartz.com

Connect With Us!

https://plus.google.com

https://www.facebook.com/WeingartzLawnToSnow

https://twitter.com/Weingartz

http://pinterest.com/MrWeingartz


Sign up for our electronic monthly newsletter for discounts and money-saving tips.

How to Store Small Engine Equipment for Winter

How to Store Small Engine Equipment for Winter

Summertime and warm weather has drawn to a close, so your outdoor power equipment needs have changed with the fall season. That means out with summer equipment, and in with cold-weather replacements. So, here’s what you should do to prepare your small engine equipment for storage.

Fuel
First, and most importantly, you will need to empty all fuel from your four-cycle and two-cycle equipment. Most gasoline contains a substantial amount of ethanol, which breaks down over time and loosens deposits that have formed inside the engine. This causes gum-like material to move around inside the fuel system, which can clog the carburetor and other small openings. While draining your gas tank may seem like a time-consuming task, it’s actually very simple and can save you a lot of time and maintenance costs down the road.

At the end of each mowing season, start by filling your fuel tank with just enough gas to run your engine for one last mow, trim, or tilling task. Once you’ve finished perfecting your lawn, let the engine run until it stalls out and there is no longer any gas in the tank. Next, try to start the engine again to rid of any fuel that may not have escaped during the previous run (Note: For two-cycle engines, always make sure you’ve mixed the correct ratio of oil and gas before performing this step).

If you have trouble completely draining your tank or prefer to keep your small engine equipment stocked with gas, you can choose to use a fuel stabilizer. After following the previous steps to drain as much fuel as possible, refer to the instructions on your package of stabilizer and add the correct amount, followed by a full tank of fresh, high-octane gas. Run your mower (or other small engine equipment) for a few minutes to circulate the mixture throughout the carburetor, then turn the machine off. This process allows you to store a gas-filled tank for up to six months, and should let you easily start your mower after pulling it out of storage in the spring.

Spark Plugs
Spark plugs should ideally be replaced after 100 hours of use, so the end of summer is a great time to perform a routine inspection on your small engine equipment. Using a spark plug wrench, carefully turn the metal base so as not to break the plug. Once you remove the spark plug, put a few drops of oil into the open cylinder, then gently start the engine a few times to coat the cylinder walls and valves (this will help to prevent rust from forming). Taking note of the part number on the existing spark plug, replace the used plug with a new one that has the same part number (spark plugs vary greatly among different machines).

Oil & Filters

Changing the oil and oil filters keeps moving parts lubricated and removes particles from the engine, increasing its lifespan of your small engine equipment. Cleaning or replacing air filters will also help keep grass and other foreign elements out of the engine, increasing power and fuel efficiency. While paper filters should be replaced after use, foam filters can easily be washed with hot water and dish detergent, squeezed and laid out to dry, then coated in oil before they are re-inserted.

Cleaning
All those months of outdoor use almost ensure that you’ll end up with a little dirt on your small engine equipment. Lawn mowers are especially-guilty culprits, considering the large amounts of grass that tend to clump up underneath the mowing deck and inside the bag. To get rid of stubborn grass, start the mower engine, engage the blade, then spray water in front of the rear wheels (make sure you’re standing behind the mower so you stay clean and dry). When you see nothing but clear water come out from under the mower, the deck should be clean (Note: make sure the mower is completely dry before storing, and never spray water directly into the engine).

Double-Check

Now’s the time to give your small engine equipment one last inspection before stowing it away for the winter. Remember: no detail is too small when it comes to the care of your outdoor power equipment. Sharpen or replace dull mower blades, clean battery terminals, tighten screws, and check for worn belts, tires, and wheels. If you have a string trimmer, be sure to clean and rewind the string head, as well as sharpen the string-cutting blade on the debris deflector. Sharpen your chainsaws, as well, and be sure to have extra chain on hand for those cold, winter work days when hidden obstacles may cause damage to your saw (Note: As a general rule of thumb, it’s always a good idea to have spare parts on hand for those that are most often in need of replacement).

Storage
Be sure to store your small engine equipment somewhere clean and dry—ideally, a garage or shed that offers protection from rain, snow, and other winter elements. For additional protection, consider covering your mower with a tarp to block out possible moisture. Moth balls also help protect against pests that could nest inside the engine, while removing the battery and storing it in a warm, indoor location could help extend performance life.

Summary
By taking care of cleaning and maintenance tasks before the winter season, you can build a regular routine that will help you greatly extend the life of your small engine equipment. From fuel to filters, blades to belts—your small engine equipment will thank you for the effort you put in, saving you a substantial amount of work in the spring.

You May Also Enjoy These Articles:

Engine Oil Maintenance

5 Reasons Pre-Mixed Fuel is Best

How to Mix the Correct Ratio of Fuel and Oil

Spark Plug Maintenance

Lawn Mower Maintenance

Fall Lawn Care Tips

Why Weingartz?

Weingartz, family owned and operated, began in 1945 as a farm supply store for local Michigan families. In the 1970s, we began to focus exclusively on outdoor power equipment. Over time, we morphed into the “power equipment superstore” that now defines all of our locations. The staff and experts at Weingartz work diligently to provide the best service possible and give honest and helpful advice to each and every customer.

Weingartz also sells parts for all outdoor power equipment at https://weingartz.com/parts-lookup.


Weingartz
5436 Jackson Rd.
Ann Arbor, MI 48103
(734) 239-8200
info@weingartz.com

Connect With Us!

https://plus.google.com

https://www.facebook.com/WeingartzLawnToSnow

https://twitter.com/Weingartz

http://pinterest.com/MrWeingartz


Sign up for our electronic monthly newsletter for discounts and money-saving tips.

Shop Parts New Equipment

Excessive handlebar vibration

Q. My lawn mower seems to have excessive handlebar vibration that is interrupting my golf game, what could be the problem?

A. When diagnosing abnormal or excessive handlebar vibration, always check the obvious items first: a possible bent crankshaft, bent or out-of-balance blades, and/or excessive engine rpm. There’s something else you should also look for – grass in the crankshaft drive pulley. In rare cases, grass can build up and pack in the crankshaft drive pulley under the crankshaft drive belt, which will usually result in significant vibration. Inspect the pulley carefully, and if you see any grass, remove it using a flat head screwdriver. Then recheck for excessive handlebar vibration. I hope your golf game improved.

Different types of tiller blades or tines

Different-types-of-tiller-blades-or-tines - Featured Image

Q.  What are the different types of blades available on tillers?  

A.  Tiller blades are also known as tines. The tiller tine cultivates and moves through the soil. There are three types of tiller tines: Bolo, Pick and Chisel, and Slasher.

The standard tines that come with most machines are Bolo tines. These are used for deep tilling with little clogging.

On the other hand, Pick and Chisel tines are slightly curved and used for hard or rocky soil. Yet, these tines can easily clog in vegetation.

For heavy vegetation or soil with roots, you will want to use the Slasher tine. These tines are short and sharp. It is important that you keep your Slasher tines very sharp in order to obtain good results.

Stop by any Weingartz store if you would like to see a demonstration, or click here to find parts for your tiller.


Why Weingartz?

Weingartz, family owned and operated, began in 1945 as a farm supply store for local Michigan families. In the 1970s, we began to focus exclusively on outdoor power equipment. Over time, we morphed into the “power equipment superstore” that now defines all of our locations. The staff and experts at Weingartz work diligently to provide the best service possible and give honest and helpful advice to each and every customer.

Weingartz also sells parts for all outdoor power equipment at https://weingartz.com/parts-lookup.

Weingartz
46061 Van Dyke Ave.
Utica, MI 48317
(586) 731-7240
info@weingartz.com

Connect With Us!

https://plus.google.com

https://www.facebook.com/WeingartzLawnToSnow

https://twitter.com/Weingartz

http://pinterest.com/MrWeingartz

 

Sign up for our electronic monthly newsletter for discounts and money-saving tips.