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Buyer’s Guide to Chainsaws

Buyer's-Guide-to-Chainsaws - Featured Image

Maintaining a clean and neat looking yard is important and easy when you have the proper equipment. Chainsaws take care of messy fallen limbs and allow you to tackle tree felling and cleanup, firewood cutting, and other light to large cutting jobs. Here is a guide to help you decide which chainsaw is right for you.

Aspects to consider when selecting a chainsaw:

Type of Chainsaw

Gas chainsaws range in sizes and tackle a variety of small and large tasks. Smaller sizes are lightweight, easy to handle, and best for occasional use. Larger models are better for heavy use and hard trees with larger diameters.

Electric chainsaws have a cord that needs to be plugged in to operate. These lightweight models complete tasks without producing exhaust emissions are best for light trimming jobs.

Battery-powered chainsaws are cordless and start easily with the squeeze of a trigger. They are much quieter than gas-powered models. Though compact and lightweight these saws deliver strong, consistent power.

Type of Gas Powered Chainsaw

Top handle models allow you to control the chainsaw from the top. These are primarily used for work in a tree or when handling low hanging branches, making them popular among professional arborists.

Rear handle chainsaws have both a front and rear handle which allows for better mobility and versatility. These models are easy to control due to the wide space between the front and rear handles.

Bar Length

For home use 14, 16, and 18-inch bars are best. Bars run as large as 40 inches for professional use. These saws come with anti-vibration systems and large-diameter caps that can be removed easily.

Features

Different chainsaw models are equipped with different features. All models will not have all features as they greatly vary. Chainsaw features include an anti-vibration system, quick chain adjuster, chain catcher, decompression valve, side-access chain tensioner, and toolless fuel and oil caps,

All chainsaws are designed with a chain braking system to prevent injuries. Professional-grade saws for prolonged usage may be lightweight but still hold much horsepower.

Maintenance

Regular maintenance and saw chain care are necessary for the longevity of your chainsaw. Sharp chains are important and it is always a good idea to have a spare chain.

Additional maintenance is needed based on your chainsaw type. Electric and battery-powered saws require battery care. A gas powered saw requires regular oil, bar oil reservoir, and air filter changes.

Feel free to contact us for any of your chainsaw maintenance needs.

Protective and Work Wear

Ear and eye protection are incredibly important to prevent injuries. Helmet systems are available; system includes a hard hat with attached face shield and built-in ear protection. Working with your hands is no easy task so protect them with gloves. These gloves provide grip and can help reduce vibration. They will keep your hands protected and comfortable so find the right pair for your outdoor tasks. You may also consider a pair of chaps to prevent leg injuries.

Ready to make your decision? Click here to shop chainsaws or contact us for more information.

 

You May Also Enjoy These Articles:

5 Chainsaw Maintenance Tips

18 Chainsaw Terms Every Homeowner Should Know 

Winter Chainsaw Safety

How to Replace the Chain on a Chainsaw

How to Tension the Chain on a Chainsaw

Can I Use Regular Motor Oil in My Chainsaw?

 

Why Weingartz?

Weingartz, family owned and operated, began in 1945 as a farm supply store for local Michigan families. In the 1970s, we began to focus exclusively on outdoor power equipment. Over time, we morphed into the “power equipment superstore” that now defines all of our locations. The staff and experts at Weingartz work diligently to provide the best service possible and give honest and helpful advice to each and every customer.

Weingartz also sells parts for all outdoor power equipment at https://weingartz.com/parts-lookup.

Weingartz
5436 Jackson Rd.
Ann Arbor, MI 48103
(734) 239-8200
info@weingartz.com

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      TSnow Blowers Buyers Guide - Shop Illustrated Diagrams      5 Chainsaw Maintenance Tips - ShopEquipmentStihl

5 Chainsaw Maintenance Tips

5 Chainsaw Maintenance Tips - Featured Image

As we move from summer to windy, rainy fall the best tool in your arsenal has to be your chainsaw. Trees can fall at any given moment with little help from outside influences. Ice and snow from the winter months build up on the branches and the high winds of spring increase their odds of breaking and making a mess of your yard. This is why it is important to use these chainsaw maintenance tips to ensure your equipment is ready for the fall and winter months.

Chainsaw Maintenance Tips – Correct fuel and oil ratio

When it comes to making sure your chainsaws are ready a little regular maintenance goes a long way. Maintenance is not only simple; it takes almost no time at all to perform. The most important thing is to make sure you have the correct ratio of fuel and oil in your fuel tank. Without the proper ratio, you run the risk of doing serious damage to your saw.

Chainsaw Maintenance Tips – Bar oil reservoir

Next thing to look at is your bar oil reservoir, this keeps the chain well lubricated and reduces the friction between the chain and the bar. Typically you can expect to fill this oil every time you fill it with fuel. Doing this will extend the life of your chain, bar, and sprocket. It is important to remember to use the proper bar oil for the season. If it’s winter you use winter grade oil and if it’s summer you use summer grade oil.

Chainsaw Maintenance Tips – Proper chain tension

Proper chain tension can be determined if you can lift the chain out of the track to where you can just barely see the bottom of the tooth on the chain. It should snap back into place if the right amount of tension is applied.

Chainsaw Maintenance Tips – Sharp chain

The saw chain on your chainsaw may become dull over time. If your saw is dull and needs to be sharpened there are a few things to look for.

  • The saw chain will not pull itself into the wood. You will have to force it to cut by applying pressure to the engine unit.
  • When making a vertical cut the saw chain will create fine sawdust instead of coarse strands.
  • Smoke rises up even though the chain lubrication is in working condition and the chain tension is correct.
  • The chainsaw rattles and bounces while cutting, making it difficult to get precise positioning.

If you notice these signs while using your chainsaw it’s time to sharpen and possibly replace the saw chain.

Chainsaw Maintenance Tips – Clean air filter

The air filter on your chainsaw keeps dirt, dust, and other debris from entering your chainsaw’s carburetor, which can negatively impact the engine and hinder performance if not properly maintained. Make sure to regularly clean or replace your air filter to ensure optimal performance and to prevent more costly repairs down the road.

There is nothing more frustrating than having a piece of equipment that isn’t ready for the job ahead. If you take a few moments to utilize these chainsaw maintenance tips you can save yourself a lot of time and hassle.

You May Also Enjoy These Articles

 18 Chainsaw Terms Every Homeowner Should Know

Winter Chainsaw Safety

How to Replace the Chain on a Chainsaw

How to Tension the Chain on a Chainsaw

Can I Use Regular Motor Oil in My Chainsaw?

Why Did My Chainsaw Stop?

Why Weingartz?

Weingartz, family owned and operated, began in 1945 as a farm supply store for local Michigan families. In the 1970s, we began to focus exclusively on outdoor power equipment. Over time, we morphed into the “power equipment superstore” that now defines all of our locations. The staff and experts at Weingartz work diligently to provide the best service possible and give honest and helpful advice to each and every customer.

Weingartz also sells parts for all outdoor power equipment at https://weingartz.com/parts-lookup.

Weingartz
6585 Dixie Hwy.
Clarkston, MI 48346
(248) 620-5258
info@weingartz.com

Connect With Us!

https://plus.google.com

https://www.facebook.com/WeingartzLawnToSnow

https://twitter.com/Weingartz

http://pinterest.com/MrWeingartz

 

Sign up for our electronic monthly newsletter for discounts ad money-saving tips.

      6 Snow Blower Maintenance Tips - Shop Illustrated Diagrams     5 Chainsaw Maintenance Tips - ShopEquipmentStihl

How to Store Small Engine Equipment for Winter

How To Store Small Engine Equipment For Winter - Weingartz Expert Advice

As summertime and warm weather draw to a close, your outdoor power equipment needs will change for the onset of a new season. That means out with summer equipment, and in with cold-weather replacements. So, what should you do to prepare your small engine equipment for storage?

Fuel
First, and most importantly, you will need to empty all fuel from your four-cycle and two-cycle equipment. Most gasoline contains a substantial amount of ethanol, which breaks down over time and loosens deposits that have formed inside the engine. This causes gum-like material to move around inside the fuel system, which can clog the carburetor and other small openings. While draining your gas tank may seem like a time-consuming task, it’s actually very simple and can save you a lot of time and maintenance costs down the road.

At the end of each mowing season, start by filling your fuel tank with just enough gas to run your engine for one last mow, trim, or tilling task. Once you’ve finished perfecting your lawn, let the engine run until it stalls out and there is no longer any gas in the tank. Next, try to start the engine again to rid of any fuel that may not have escaped during the previous run (Note: For two-cycle engines, always make sure you’ve mixed the correct ratio of oil and gas before performing this step).

If you have trouble completely draining your tank or prefer to keep your small engine equipment stocked with gas, you can choose to use a fuel stabilizer. After following the previous steps to drain as much fuel as possible, refer to the instructions on your package of stabilizer and add the correct amount, followed by a full tank of fresh, high-octane gas. Run your mower (or other small engine equipment) for a few minutes to circulate the mixture throughout the carburetor, then turn the machine off. This process allows you to store a gas-filled tank for up to six months, and should let you easily start your mower after pulling it out of storage in the spring.

Spark Plugs
Spark plugs should ideally be replaced after 100 hours of use, so the end of summer is a great time to perform a routine inspection. Using a crescent wrench or pair of vise grips, carefully turn the metal base so as not to break the plug. Once you remove the spark plug, put a few drops of oil into the open cylinder, then gently start the engine a few times to coat the cylinder walls and valves (this will help to prevent rust from forming). Taking note of the part number on the existing spark plug, replace the used plug with a new one that has the same part number (spark plugs vary greatly among different machines).

Oil & Filters

Changing the oil and oil filters keeps moving parts lubricated and removes particles from the engine, increasing its lifespan. Cleaning or replacing air filters will also help keep grass and other foreign elements out of the engine, increasing power and fuel efficiency. While paper filters should be replaced after use, foam filters can easily be washed with hot water and dish detergent, squeezed and laid out to dry, then coated in oil before they are re-inserted.

Cleaning
All those months of outdoor use almost ensure that you’ll end up with a little dirt at the end of the season! Lawn mowers are especially-guilty culprits, considering the large amounts of grass that tend to clump up underneath the mowing deck and inside the bag. To get rid of stubborn grass, start the mower engine, engage the blade, then spray water in front of the rear wheels (make sure you’re standing behind the mower so you stay clean and dry). When you see nothing but clear water come out from under the mower, the deck should be clean (Note: make sure the mower is completely dry before storing, and never spray water directly into the engine).

Double-Check

Now’s the time to give your small engine equipment one last inspection before stowing it away for the winter. Remember: no detail is too small when it comes to the care of your outdoor power equipment. Sharpen or replace dull mower blades, clean battery terminals, tighten screws, and check for worn belts, tires, and wheels. If you have a string trimmer, be sure to clean and rewind the string head, as well as sharpen the string-cutting blade on the debris deflector. Sharpen your chainsaws, as well, and be sure to have extra chain on hand for those cold, winter work days when hidden obstacles may cause damage to your saw (Note: As a general rule of thumb, it’s always a good idea to have spare parts on hand for those that are most often in need of replacement).

Storage
Be sure to store your small engine equipment somewhere clean and dry—ideally, a garage or shed that offers protection from rain, snow, and other winter elements. For additional protection, consider covering your mower with a tarp to block out possible moisture. Moth balls also help protect against pests that could nest inside the engine, while removing the battery and storing it in a warm, indoor location could help extend performance life.

Summary
By taking care of cleaning and maintenance tasks at the end of the summer season, you can build a regular routine that will help you greatly extend the life of your small engine equipment. From fuel to filters, blades to belts—your small engine equipment will thank you for the effort you put in, saving you a substantial amount of work in the spring.


Weingartz
5436 Jackson Rd.
Ann Arbor, MI 48103
(734) 239-8200
info@weingartz.com

Connect With Us!

https://plus.google.com

https://www.facebook.com/WeingartzLawnToSnow

https://twitter.com/Weingartz

http://pinterest.com/MrWeingartz


Sign up for our electronic monthly newsletter for discounts and money-saving tips.

Small Engine Equipment Illustrated Parts Diagrams

Small Engine Equipment Illustrated Parts Diagrams

Why Did My Chainsaw Stop?

Q. I just had my chainsaw chain professionally sharpened. I reinstalled the chain on my saw and went to cut wood. After cutting through the bark, the chain stopped cutting. What is wrong?

A. The chain may be on backwards. The chain turns clockwise on the bar. Check to see if the cutters are pointing away from you when they are on the top of the bar and towards you when they are on the bottom of the bar. If not, simply turn the chain around. Need a new chain for your chainsaw? Click here to find one with our easy parts lookup!

Can I use regular motor oil in the reservoir for a chainsaw’s bar and chain lubricant?

Q. I have a chain saw. Can I use regular motor oil in the reservoir for the bar and chain lubricant?

A.  Chain saw bar and chain oil are highly recommended for this application. Bar and chain oil comes in two different weights of oil – one for summer use and one a little thinner for winter use. Both have special additives so the oil sticks to the chain and doesn’t fling off when running. Chain saw engines run from 10,500 RPM to 14,000 RPM at full throttle. At those speeds the chain is rotating around the bar pretty fast. The bar lubricant has to be able to adhere to the chain for complete lubrication around the bar.

Chainsaw bar and chain oil

Q: I have a chainsaw. Can I use regular motor oil in the reservoir for the bar and chain lubricant?

A: Chainsaw bar and chain oil are highly recommended for this application. Bar and chain oil comes in two different weights of oil–one for summer use, and one that’s a little thinner for winter use. Both have special additives, so the oil sticks to the chain and doesn’t fling off when running. Chainsaw engines run from 10,500 RPM to 14,000 RPM at full throttle. At those speeds, the chain rotates around the bar pretty quickly. The bar lubricant has to be able to adhere to the chain for complete lubrication around the bar.

The Right Amount of Chainsaw Oil

Q: How do I know if my chainsaw bar and chain are getting enough oil?

A: One way to test if your chain oiler is working correctly is to lay a piece of cardboard on a stump or the ground. Start the unit and place the top of the bar approximately one food above the paper. As you apply full throttle, a thin line of oil should appear on the paper. Once you see this thin line of oil, you know your bar and chain assembly is getting the proper amount of oil. If your chainsaw is not operating properly, stop by our service department and we can further troubleshoot.