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How to Prepare your Snow Blower for Winter

How to Prepare your Snow Blower for Winter

Winter is coming. Is your snow blower ready to tackle snow and ice this year? Here are tips to help ensure your snow blower has the proper maintenance and is ready to go when snow falls.

Drain old fuel and replace with fresh fuel.

Old fuel can cause problems for your blower’s engine, making it hard to start.

Also, consider adding a fuel stabilizer so your fuel stays fresh even if you don’t need to use your snow blower.

Change the oil in your snow blower.

This should also be done after the first five hours of use this winter and after every subsequent season.

Old oil can cause problems for your machine’s engine, making it hard to start. If there is old oil, dispose of it properly. There is an oil drain plug in the back of your snow blower. Use a wrench to remove the plug and drain the oil into a container.

Make sure all parts are moving smoothly.

Make sure you tighten loose nuts and bolts. Your snow blower may vibrate during operation, causing nuts and bolts to loosen. Tighten those up to prevent them from falling off when your snow blower is in use.

Additionally, check to make sure belts and cables are in good condition. If you spot any damage, replace them. Any significant wear and tear call for a replacement to avoid the danger of a belt breaking during use.

Install a new spark plug.

Install a new spark plug, if necessary. Check your spark plug at the start of each season.

Disconnect the spark plug lead from the spark plug. Remove the spark plug with a spark plug socket wrench and remove debris from around the spark plug. Examine your spark plug and check for any damage. If there is damage, rust or corrosion on your snow blower’s spark plug, replace the spark plug.

After your snow blower is prepared for winter, start it up and let it run for a few minutes in a well-ventilated area to be certain everything works properly. Consider starting your machine every so often if it sits for an extended period.

Not all snow blowers are the same so consult your owner’s manual before repairing your equipment.

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Why Weingartz?

Weingartz, family owned and operated, began in 1945 as a farm supply store for local Michigan families. In the 1970s, we began to focus exclusively on outdoor power equipment. Over time, we morphed into the “power equipment superstore” that now defines all of our locations. The staff and experts at Weingartz work diligently to provide the best service possible and give honest and helpful advice to each and every customer.

Weingartz also sells parts for all outdoor power equipment at https://weingartz.com/parts-lookup.

Weingartz
39050 Grand River Ave
Farmington Hills, MI 48335
(248) 471-3050
info@weingartz.com

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Performing Proper Engine Maintenance

Performing Proper Engine Maintenance

Maintenance is an unavoidable part of a landscaper’s job but is necessary to keep your fleet prepared for productivity and reduce downtime. Here are top maintenance tips to keep your engine in great condition to maintain productivity on jobsites.

Maintenance Tip # 1 – Evaluate Your Fleet

At the beginning and end of the season, check your equipment fleet and their engines. Examine the condition of those engines. Are they old and no longer performing properly or experiencing issues? Can these issues be resolved with proper maintenance or are they just related to old age? If so, it may be time to invest in a new engine or machine.

Maintenance Tip # 2 – Check Spark Plugs Regularly

Over time, spark plugs can become susceptible to carbon deposits and other damage that hinders your machine’s performance. Worn spark plugs can lead to stalling, difficulty starting, and engine misfires. Remove and inspect your engine’s spark plugs on a regular basis and replace them when necessary.

Maintenance Tip # 3 – Change Engine Oil Regularly

You know the importance of regular oil changes. Skipping oil changes can result in engine damage and relying on old oil can lead to lower engine performance and long-term damage. Make sure you understand the guidelines for your fleet’s engines. Knowing your engine’s oil-change intervals and sticking to them keeps your fleet running and working properly.

Maintenance Tip # 4 – Change Filters

Replace your machine’s oil filter, air filter, and fuel filter regularly.

Change the oil filter in your machine every time you change your oil. The oil filter is designed to remove as much debris as possible to help the engine run smoothly.

Air filters help prevent dirt and debris from getting into your machine’s engine. A dirty air filter can reduce air flow, while a clean air filter can improve engine performance and fuel efficiency.

For the fuel filter to help keep contaminants from entering the engine through the fuel line, replace it annually, after each season, or every 200 hours of operation.

Maintenance Tip # 5 – Use Proper Fuel

It goes without saying that your outdoor power equipment needs fuel to operate properly.  Since the engine in your OPE is only as good as the fuel you put in it, make sure you know the right type of fuel to use in your machine.

Engines produced for use in outdoor power equipment are not designed for gasoline with more than 10% ethanol. Using higher ethanol fuel blends can lead to engine damage and performance issues.

Ethanol-free gasoline with an octane rating of 87 or higher is generally a good fuel choice. Choosing the correct fuel for your engine is the best way to ensure proper performance and avoid engine issues and long-term damage.

Maintenance Tip # 6 – Store Your Equipment Properly

If you need to store your equipment for a significant amount of time, use a fuel stabilizer to combat stale fuel. As you know, fuel starts to go bad after 30 days so do not let it sit in your machine for longer than that. After 30 days, the volatile compounds in the fuel start evaporating, and this occurs whether the gas is in your outdoor power equipment or in the gas can.

As fuel sits and grows older, it evaporates and forms brown sticky deposits that eventually turn into a hard varnish. Deposits and varnish can plug fuel lines and passages in the carburetor, preventing the engine from running properly.

Fuel stabilizers separate and create a thin film on top of the fuel to keep out air and moisture. They also help prevent varnish buildup and can combat the corrosion.

Maintenance Tip # 7 – Use Propane

Consider using propane for your machines. In some cases, fueling with propane can offer benefits for your business. Propane eliminates some elements of operator error. For example, gas spillage can cause dead or brown spots. With propane, spill­age will never be an issue.

Fueling with propane can also help avoid fuel storage issues. Unlike fuel, propane isn’t susceptible to going stale, so your equipment can be stored with propane in it for long periods of time.

Lastly, using propane can impact your maintenance schedule by reducing the amount of time spent refueling. When your crew stops to refuel, that can add up to hours of lost productivity. With propane, you can easily refuel on the job.

Performing proper engine maintenance is essential to ensuring your fleet is up and running.

Why Weingartz?

Weingartz, family owned and operated, began in 1945 as a farm supply store for local Michigan families. In the 1970s, we began to focus exclusively on outdoor power equipment. Over time, we morphed into the “power equipment superstore” that now defines all of our locations. The staff and experts at Weingartz work diligently to provide the best service possible and give honest and helpful advice to each and every customer.

Weingartz also sells parts for all outdoor power equipment at https://weingartz.com/parts-lookup.

Weingartz
32098 Plymouth Road
Livonia, MI 48150
(734) 525-0980
info@weingartz.com

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Lawn Mower Maintenance Checklist

Lawn Mower Maintenance Checklist

A well-maintained lawn mower can provide years of reliable operation. To maximize the life of your mower, follow these checklist items.

Before performing any maintenance on your lawn mower, refer to your operator’s manual as it lists the required maintenance, safety information, and instructions for your machine. Maintenance instructions vary by model, so depending on your lawn mower model our instructions may vary slightly.

Before inspecting or repairing your mower, make sure you shut off the engine and allow it to cool. Disconnect the spark plug wire to prevent accidental starting and tuck it out of the way so the wire doesn’t make contact with the spark plug.

Checklist tip #1 – Check nuts, screws and bolts

Tighten all nuts, screws and engine mounting bolts frequently. Over time, they become loose due to the motion of your lawn mower.

Checklist tip #2 – Check for leaks

Inspect the fuel line, tank, cap and fittings frequently.  Look for cracks or leaks, and replace if necessary.

Checklist tip #3 – Make sure mower blades are sharp

A sharp lawn mower blade is crucial to keeping your lawn well-groomed. To achieve a quality cut and healthy lawn, it is important to check your mower blades to ensure they are sharp and able to cut. When working with mower blades, use caution. Wrap them or wear gloves when touching or removing them.

Checklist tip #4 – Inspect blades for damage

You should periodically inspect your lawn mower blade for damage. Look for large chips or dents in the cutting edge that cannot be smoothed out. Inconsistencies in the blade can tear grass instead of delivering a clean cut.

Pay attention to the thickness of your lawn mower blade. Over time, sand, dirt, and other debris can erode the blade, causing the metal to weaken and become thin. If you notice this, replace the blade to avoid breakage during mowing.

Checklist tip #5 – Inspect mower if you suspect trouble

If you strike a foreign object while mowing, stop the engine and disconnect the spark plug to prevent accidental starting. Inspect your lawn mower for any damage caused by the object and make repairs before starting and operating your mower again.

Checklist tip #6 – Frequently check other components

Don’t neglect other mower components like discharge covers, grass catchers and trail shields because these are likely to wear and endure damage that could expose moving parts or allow objects to be thrown. For safe operation, replace damaged components immediately.

By following a lawn mower maintenance checklist, you can ensure your mower operates properly and efficiently for many years. For help with any maintenance, feel free to contact us and our expert technicians will performance the maintenance for you.

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How to Change the Engine Oil in a Lawn Mower

How to Sharpen the Blade on Your Walk Behind Lawn Mower

How to Change the Spark Plug on a Walk Behind Lawn Mower

Why Weingartz?

Weingartz, family owned and operated, began in 1945 as a farm supply store for local Michigan families. In the 1970s, we began to focus exclusively on outdoor power equipment. Over time, we morphed into the “power equipment superstore” that now defines all of our locations. The staff and experts at Weingartz work diligently to provide the best service possible and give honest and helpful advice to each and every customer.

Weingartz
46061 Van Dyke Ave.
Utica, MI 48317
(586) 731-7240
info@weingartz.com

Connect With Us!

https://plus.google.com

https://www.facebook.com/WeingartzLawnToSnow

https://twitter.com/Weingartz

http://pinterest.com/MrWeingartz

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Leaf Blower Troubleshooting Tips

Leaf Blower Troubleshooting Tips

Leaf cleanup can be a painful task if you don’t have the proper equipment or if your equipment simply won’t work properly. If you want your leaf blower to work effectively each time you start it, there are certain maintenance steps to take to ensure your machine is in great condition. Maximize the life of your leaf blower with these troubleshooting tips.

Check the carburetor

A common problem that affects the starting and performance of your leaf blower is a clogged carburetor, which is commonly a result of leaving fuel in the machine for a long period of time. Over time, ingredients in the fuel evaporate and leave a thick, sticky substance. That sticky substance can clog up the carburetor, preventing the engine from starting.

If the carburetor is clogged, clean it with carburetor cleaner. If this is not effective, rebuild or replace the entire carburetor.

Inspect the spark plug

Another common problem that affects the performance of your leaf blower is a defective spark plug. If your machine won’t start, inspect the spark plug for damage. To check if the spark plug is defective, use a spark plug tester. When testing the plug, you should see a strong spark between the tester’s terminals when the engine is cranking. If there is no spark, the spark plug is defective and you need to replace it.

Also inspect the spark plug for any signs of wear. If you notice heavy carbon buildup at the electrode, a burned away or damaged electrode, or a cracked insulator, it’s time to replace the spark plug.

Replace filters

If the air filter and fuel filter are not well-maintained, your leaf blower will not work properly. If your machine won’t start, the air filter may be clogged. With a clogged air filter, the engine will get too much fuel and not enough air. If the air filter is clogged, replace it.

The fuel filter may also be clogged if the engine won’t start. Similar to the carburetor, a clogged fuel filter is usually the result of leaving fuel in your machine for a long period of time. Again, a thick, sticky substance forms, clogging the fuel filter. If old fuel was left in your leaf blower, drain the fuel and replace the fuel filter.

Check the recoil starter and ignition coil

The recoil starter assembly engages the crankshaft to turn over the engine so if the recoil starter assembly is defective, your leaf blower will not start. Remove the starter assembly to inspect it and determine if it’s working properly. Pull the starter rope. Tabs extending from the pulley and cam should grab the hub on the engine and cause the engine to turn. Release the rope. The tabs should retract and the rope should rewind back on the pulley. If the recoil starter assembly is not working properly, you need to replace it.

The ignition coil on your leaf blower sends voltage to the spark plug while the engine is running. If the ignition coil is defective, the engine won’t start. Test the ignition coil with an ignition coil tester. If the ignition coil is defective, replace it.

Staying on top of routine maintenance will increase the performance and life span of your leaf blower. If you have additional questions about issues with your machine, contact us for more information.

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Buyer’s Guide to Leaf Blowers

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Why Weingartz?

Weingartz, family owned and operated, began in 1945 as a farm supply store for local Michigan families. In the 1970s, we began to focus exclusively on outdoor power equipment. Over time, we morphed into the “power equipment superstore” that now defines all of our locations. The staff and experts at Weingartz work diligently to provide the best service possible and give honest and helpful advice to each and every customer.

Weingartz also sells parts for all outdoor power equipment at https://weingartz.com/parts-lookup.

Weingartz
11875 Northland Dr. 
Cedar Springs, MI 49319
(616) 696-2913
info@weingartz.com

Connect With Us!

https://plus.google.com

https://www.facebook.com/WeingartzLawnToSnow

https://twitter.com/Weingartz

http://pinterest.com/MrWeingartz

 

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How to Change the Spark Plug on a Honda Generator

How to Change the Spark Plug on a Honda Generator

Without a well-maintained spark plug, your generator won’t start. Bad spark plugs can cause issues for your machine, altering engine performance. You should check and/or replace the spark plug on your generator every year to ensure reliable starting and improve fuel economy. You can also check the spark plug every season or every 25 hours of use to determine whether it is time for a replacement.

Before performing any maintenance on your generator, refer to your owner’s manual for recommended maintenance and safety information. Maintenance instructions vary by model, so depending on your generator model our instructions may vary slightly.

Before performing any repair or maintenance on a generator, follow these safety precautions:

  • Turn fuel valve to off – prevents any spilling, any leakage or fire as the machine spills
  • Make sure machine is in the off position

To carry out this task, you’ll need these tools:

  • 5/8 socket
  • Ratchet
  • Extension

To change the spark plug on a Honda generator, you need to first access the spark plug. On some generator models, there is a panel on the top that can be removed. On other models, there is no panel to remove.

There is an ignition coil on the generator that goes into the cylinder. Pull the ignition coil up and it comes out very easily. Use your socket and extension to remove the spark plug.

Replace the old spark plug with a new one and tighten the spark plug down. Reinstall the ignition wire. Replace the top panel cover if necessary. Start the machine by turning the switch to the on position, choke, and give it a pull.

Too often, outdoor power equipment does not receive the maintenance it needs to keep operating properly. This is why it is important to know when and how to check and/or change the spark plug in your generator. Don’t neglect recommended maintenance, and do what needs to be done to keep your generator in the best condition possible.

You May Also Enjoy These Articles:

How to Change the Spark Plug on a Lawn Tractor

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How to Change the Air Filter in a Honda Generator

How to Change the Oil in a Honda Generator

Buyer’s Guide to a Portable Generator

Why Weingartz?

Weingartz, family owned and operated, began in 1945 as a farm supply store for local Michigan families. In the 1970s, we began to focus exclusively on outdoor power equipment. Over time, we morphed into the “power equipment superstore” that now defines all of our locations. The staff and experts at Weingartz work diligently to provide the best service possible and give honest and helpful advice to each and every customer.

Weingartz also sells parts for all outdoor power equipment at https://weingartz.com/parts-lookup.

Weingartz
39050 Grand River Ave.
Farmington Hills, MI 48335
(248) 471-3050
info@weingartz.com

Connect With Us!

https://plus.google.com

https://www.facebook.com/WeingartzLawnToSnow

https://twitter.com/Weingartz

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Learn More About Specific Honda Generator Models

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Lawn Mower Troubleshooting Tips

Lawn Mower Troubleshooting Tips

Any outdoor power equipment that is not properly cared for will have a shorter life and more and more problems, and your lawn mower is no exception. Your lawn mower is most likely the most frequently used piece of outdoor power equipment so perform the proper maintenance to maximize life and efficiency. Spring is upon us and that means it’s time to begin your yard maintenance. Here’s what to do when you’re ready to tackle yard work but your equipment isn’t.

Check spark plugs and carburetors

 Common problems that affect the starting and performance of your lawn mower are clogged air filters, fouled spark plugs, and flooded carburetors.

Replacing the spark plug can make a huge difference in the performance of your mower. We recommend that you change your spark plug every two years. To combat a flooded carburetor you need to drain the carburetor and put new fuel in it.

Utilize new fuel and air filters

Starting with fresh fuel and a clean air filter will help prevent lawn mower problems. To clean your air filter, tap it to remove lose debris. If you hold it to the light and see the light, it’s okay to use. If there is no light, replace it with a new air filter.

 Use fresh, mid-grade fuel with no higher than E10 Ethanol rating, stored in a clean, sealed container.

Keep a sharp lawn mower blade

Take a look at the lawn mower blade. A dull blade will not prevent your lawn mower from starting but it will affect your lawn.

Dull blades trim grass unevenly and leave the tips of your grass torn and not cleanly-sliced. Thus, a sharp blade eliminates many lawn issues. If your blade is dull, bring it into Weingartz to have it sharpened and balanced while you wait.

Check bolts, wheels, cables and belts

Tighten all bolts and check to make sure that the lawn mower wheels, cables and belts are not overly worn to avoid problems when you are mowing.

Keep up with routine maintenance

Staying on top of routine maintenance will increase the performance and life span of your lawn mower and all outdoor power equipment.

For regular maintenance, feel free to visit your local Weingartz where we have an entire team dedicated to making sure your equipment is running at its highest efficiency or visit Weingartz.com.

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Why Weingartz?

Weingartz, family owned and operated, began in 1945 as a farm supply store for local Michigan families. In the 1970s, we began to focus exclusively on outdoor power equipment. Over time, we morphed into the “power equipment superstore” that now defines all of our locations. The staff and experts at Weingartz work diligently to provide the best service possible and give honest and helpful advice to each and every customer.

Weingartz also sells parts for all outdoor power equipment at https://weingartz.com/parts-lookup.

Weingartz
11875 Northland Dr.
Cedar Springs, MI 49319
(616) 696-2913
info@weingartz.com

Connect With Us!

https://plus.google.com

https://www.facebook.com/WeingartzLawnToSnow

https://twitter.com/Weingartz

http://pinterest.com/MrWeingartz

Learn More About Brand Specific Lawn Mowers

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Weingartz At-Home Maintenance

At Home Maintenance

We know you’re getting ready for spring and we’re here to help. Normal wear and tear results in lower machine efficiency so regular maintenance is a must. Whether you are a commercial landscaper or a residential user, basic lawn mower maintenance is essential.

Weingartz At-Home Maintenance service assures optimal working conditions and a long life span for your equipment. With the at-home maintenance service, we send our factory-certified technicians to your home with maintenance trucks fully equipped with tools such as air compressors, air filters, blade sharpeners, maintenance kits, etc. to service your machine, conveniently eliminating bringing your machine in and being without it for any amount of time.

Our maintenance trucks are also equipped with overhead cranes, which allow our technicians to lift your machine, look underneath, and perform the proper maintenance on the spot. (You must be home to take advantage of the at-home maintenance unless you prepaid for the service).

Our technicians are always prepared to service your equipment. Call to schedule your service today or schedule service online and we’ll make sure your machine stays in good shape all year long. (Your machine must start and cut in order to receive maintenance).

The At-Home Maintenance service is available at the following locations: Ann Arbor, Clarkston, Farmington Hills, Utica

At-Home Maintenance Includes:

  • Replace oil filter and change engine oil
  • Replace spark plug(s) and fuel filter
  • Replace (or clean) air filter
  • Flush fuel system (if necessary)
  • Sharpen (or replace) mower blades* and clean under deck
  • Test ignition system, charging system, and battery
  • Clean battery terminals and cooling system
  • Check and adjust RPM’s
  • Check and adjust clutch (if necessary)
  • Check and adjust brakes/emergency brake system
  • Check and adjust tire pressure (as needed)
  • Lubricate all pivot points and cables
  • Inspect all belts, pulleys and overall operation of unit
  • Inspect and test all safety features

*Cost of blades additional if requiring replacement

Planned maintenance can save your machine from hours of downtime caused by a breakdown. Your satisfaction is guaranteed so don’t hesitate to give us a call.

 

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Why Weingartz?

Weingartz, family owned and operated, began in 1945 as a farm supply store for local Michigan families. In the 1970s, we began to focus exclusively on outdoor power equipment. Over time, we morphed into the “power equipment superstore” that now defines all of our locations. The staff and experts at Weingartz work diligently to provide the best service possible and give honest and helpful advice to each and every customer.

Weingartz also sells parts for all outdoor power equipment at https://weingartz.com/parts-lookup.

Weingartz
46061 Van Dyke Ave. 
Utica, MI 48317
(586) 731-7240
info@weingartz.com

Connect With Us!

https://plus.google.com

https://www.facebook.com/WeingartzLawnToSnow

https://twitter.com/Weingartz

http://pinterest.com/MrWeingartz

 

Sign up for our electronic monthly newsletter for discounts and money-saving tips.

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Spark Plug Maintenance

Spark-Plug-Maintenance - Featured Image

Just as a motor vehicle must undergo regular maintenance and upkeep, so must your outdoor power equipment. Regular maintenance keeps your machine running quietly and efficiently. If your lawn mower, snow blower, or other outdoor power equipment won’t start, a damaged spark plug may be the problem. Worn or dirty spark plugs can also cause issues for your machine, so be on the lookout for these as well. Read more to learn about  spark plug maintenance.

When to replace your spark plugs

As a rule of thumb, you should check and/or replace the spark plug on your small engine machine every year to ensure easy, reliable starting, and improve fuel economy. You may also check the spark plug every season or every 25 hours of use to determine whether it should be replaced. Lastly, if your outdoor power equipment won’t start, we recommend checking and/or replacing your spark plug.

How to check for a damaged spark plug

  • Turn your machine off and allow the engine to cool to the touch, and then disconnect the spark plug wire to prevent accidental starting.
  • Blow or clean off the area around the plug with compressed air or a brush, making sure the area is clean. This will prevent debris from getting in the combustion chamber when removing the spark plug.
  • Remove the spark plug with a spark plug socket and clean any deposits from the plug.
  • Use a wire brush or spray-on plug cleaner to remove the deposits, or a sturdy knife to scrape off tougher deposits.
  • Check the spark plug for cracked porcelain, electrodes that have been burned away, or stubborn deposits. If you find any of these issues, change the spark plug.
  • Check the spark plug gap and adjust if necessary. (While many manufacturers package new spark plugs with the cap pre-set, it is still a good idea to double-check the gap and torque according to the owner’s manual.)
  • If the spark plug is in good shape, re-attach. Make sure you don’t over-tighten the plug when replacing it.
  • Reconnect the spark plug wire and start your machine’s engine.

How to replace spark plugs

  • Disconnect the spark plug wire and clean the area around the spark plug.
  • Use a spark plug socket to remove the spark plug.
  • Check the gap on the new spark plug and replace it. Tighten the spark plug but don’t over-tighten it.
  • Reconnect the spark plug wire.

It is estimated that each Spring, over two-thirds of all lawn mowers do not receive the recommended maintenance. Knowing how to check and change your spark plugs is an important piece of information. Don’t fall behind on maintenance and do what needs to be done to keep your machine running properly all season long.

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Why Weingartz?

Weingartz, family owned and operated, began in 1945 as a farm supply store for local Michigan families. In the 1970s, we began to focus exclusively on outdoor power equipment. Over time, we morphed into the “power equipment superstore” that now defines all of our locations. The staff and experts at Weingartz work diligently to provide the best service possible and give honest and helpful advice to each and every customer.

Weingartz
6585 Dixie Hwy.
Clarkston, MI 48346
(248) 620-5258
info@weingartz.com

Connect With Us!

https://plus.google.com

https://www.facebook.com/WeingartzLawnToSnow

https://twitter.com/Weingartz

http://pinterest.com/MrWeingartz

Learn More About Brand Specific Lawn Mowers

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Types of Grass

Types-of-Grass - Featured Image

Have you ever found yourself wondering why the neighbors’ lawn is more green or well-kept though little maintenance appears to be done? It’s possible that your neighbor does not do much yard work, and this is likely a result of your neighbor having a different grass type than you.

The type of grass and the environmental conditions in which grass grows has an impact on the amount of maintenance that needs to be done.

Different types of grasses require different levels of care, for example:

Partially shaded grass – If your lawn is growing in partial shade, or four to six hours of partial shade, your grass grows slower and requires less water and fertilizer. Keep in mind that grass does require sunlight to stay healthy so consequently, your partially shaded grass may never fill in and become the envy of the neighborhood.

Turf-type tall fescue, fine fescue grasses – These types of grasses require less fertilizer than bluegrass and perennial ryegrass lawns.

Kentucky bluegrass – Lawns with Kentucky bluegrass require two to four pounds of nitrogen fertilizer yearly to maintain a beautiful appearance. To achieve this, apply two to five applications of nitrogen to the grass each year.

Here are turf-grasses that require less maintenance:

Lower maintenance lawns in Michigan have a higher percentage of fine fescues or turf-type tall fescues and need one-third to half the nitrogen that a bluegrass lawn needs.

Fine fescue – Fine fescues are a group of grasses with various needs. Creeping red fescue mixed with Kentucky bluegrass provides good turf for lawns with sunny and shaded areas. Shade-tolerant fine fescues require less fertilizer and water, and fine fescues do not grow well under wet soil conditions.

Hard and sheep fescue – Fine fescue grasses that require lower maintenance practices are hard and sheep fescue. These are stiff, bluish-green grasses that grow in clumps. This fescue is usually mixed with Kentucky bluegrass that fills in between. Hard and sheep fescue grow slow, require less fertilizer, and grow well in dry conditions.

Turf-type tall fescue – Turf-type tall fescue grasses are able to survive heat stress and grub damage. This grass requires less fertilizer and one to three applications of nitrogen. Turf-type tall fescue turf can be thick and healthy with lower maintenance practices, but it won’t have the carpet-like look of Kentucky bluegrass.

h-types-of-grass

 

To promote the health of a low maintenance lawn, give these gardening practices a try:

Watering - Lawns require about one inch of water each week, but split into multiple applications. This amount of water includes natural rainfall. Grass won’t flourish if it does not receive water from rain or irrigation.

Mulching - After mowing, collect the grass clippings to use as mulch. These clippings are great for your lawn and provide about one-third of the nitrogen needed by the lawn. Grass clippings should occasionally be returned directly to your lawn because they act as a natural fertilizer.

Mowing height - Mow the grass at three to three and a half inches tall to reduce the possibility of weed seeds developing, and to lessen the amount of water lost to evaporation. Mowing the grass at this height also helps build a larger root mass which is more tolerant to drought.

 

You May Also Enjoy These Articles:

Going Green

Watering the Lawn: 5 Things to Consider

6 Methods for Mulching

8 Best Practices for Effective Mowing

Buyer’s Guide to Walk Behind Lawn Mowers

5 Lawn Mower Tune-up Tips for Spring

Why Weingartz?

Weingartz, family owned and operated, began in 1945 as a farm supply store for local Michigan families. In the 1970s, we began to focus exclusively on outdoor power equipment. Over time, we morphed into the “power equipment superstore” that now defines all of our locations. The staff and experts at Weingartz work diligently to provide the best service possible and give honest and helpful advice to each and every customer.

Weingartz also sells parts for all outdoor power equipment at https://weingartz.com/parts-lookup.

11875 Northland Dr.
Cedar Springs, MI 49319
(616) 696-2913
info@weingartz.com

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     Types of grass    ShopEquipment

Going Green – Green Grass Not Only Looks Good But Helps the Environment

Going-Green - Featured Image

Do you suffer from yard envy? Does the grass seem greener in your neighbor’s yard? Let the Weingartz experts help you improve the look and health of your green grass, while considering today’s environmentally friendly choices.

There are plenty of sound facts to help you justify your time investment in a beautiful yard. Well-maintained grass is far more than just nice to look at. It provides a great benefit to our environment. We all remember learning that healthy green plants convert harmful CO2 to oxygen. This principle applies to all plants, both indoors and out, and grass is no exception. In addition to its oxygen-generating capabilities, there are also some benefits to the environment that are unique to grass.

Grass and plants help moderate the heat of summer with the daily dew and evaporation cycle. Just think of the look of scorched earth that you see in August on any empty lot, and you can visualize how much healthy turf cools the soil. Furthermore, the combination of healthy, aerated soil and grass is very effective in absorbing and dampening sound waves. This helps insulate us from some of the sounds of traffic, voices and other neighborhood noises.

Healthy turf traps dust and many other airborne contaminants, giving us cleaner air to breathe. Strong root systems also assist with minimizing water runoff from heavy rains by capturing and retaining water in the soil and roots, thereby decreasing the stress on sewer systems at peak flow periods and protecting against erosion.

So what strategies can you use to create the healthiest yard, both for the turf and ecologically? It’s not as complicated as you might think. In fact, the two generally go hand in hand. All it takes is consistency and some attention to a few details. The older your yard, the more likely you will need to address issues like compaction or a heavy thatch layer. Both of these conditions will prevent crucial nutrients like water and fertilizer from reaching the important root system of the grass.

Compaction occurs naturally over time, especially on grass with heavy foot traffic like our typical active families. The soil in the yard compresses to the point that water cannot soak in, but rather becomes run-off and ends up in the sewer system. Likewise, thatch can build up between the grass blades and cause the same run-off – becoming a barrier to water and nutrient absorption. By aerating the lawn and removing the thatch layer, the soil opens up again.

Proper aeration takes cores of turf from the lawn and breaks up the compaction. Those cores then break down and become an excellent top dressing for the healthy turf. Also, remember that some thatch is good, but when the buildup is more than ½” thick, it’s a good time to rake (or power-rake) to remove some of that layer. Once you are assured that the grass is able to accept water and nutrients, you can decide on an effective fertilizer. All plants, including grass, benefit from a boost of nutrients.

To guarantee the most effective treatment, try performing a soil test to determine what mix of fertilizer will be most important. Soil tests are relatively inexpensive and can save a lot of money on fertilizers by showing you exactly what the soil needs. Unfortunately, many homeowners have a tendency to go overboard on fertilizer, which can be harmful to both your grass and the environment. Locally, you can go to your MSU County Extension Office to receive personalized results from soil tests performed through Michigan State University. For more information, go to www.css.msu.edu/spnl.

As your grass starts to grow, reconsider the height your mower is set at for cutting. The new rule of thumb is to allow the grass to grow slightly taller than previous years; approximately 3 to 3½” tall and never shorter than 2½” tall. You’ll need to mow more frequently, but will have much healthier grass. Cutting more frequently is the same as pinching back flowering plants to achieve more blooms and thicker, healthier growth. Also, longer grass blades store more water and are less susceptible to heat.

The final, most effective detail of cutting the grass is to use a clean, sharp mower blade to assure that the grass is cut, not torn, and that any possible disease is not transferred across the lawn. One thing that is wonderful about summertime in Michigan is the overwhelmingly green landscape. It is something that many of us have grown up with and would have a hard time leaving. It’s our reward for hard, cold winters.

We may not have realized that these wonderful landscapes are not only beautiful for the green color, but also “green” for the environment.

Green Grass

 

You May Also Enjoy These Articles:

How to Maintain the Perfect Lawn

5 Common Lawn Care Problems and Solutions

When to Sharpen or Replace Your Lawn Mower Blade

Watering the Lawn: 5 Things to Consider

5 Lawn Mower Tune-up Tips for Spring

Why Weingartz?

Weingartz, family owned and operated, began in 1945 as a farm supply store for local Michigan families. In the 1970s, we began to focus exclusively on outdoor power equipment. Over time, we morphed into the “power equipment superstore” that now defines all of our locations. The staff and experts at Weingartz work diligently to provide the best service possible and give honest and helpful advice to each and every customer.

Weingartz also sells parts for all outdoor power equipment at https://weingartz.com/parts-lookup.

Weingartz
11875 Northland Dr.
Cedar Springs, MI 49319
(616) 696-2913
info@weingartz.com

Connect With Us!

https://plus.google.com

https://www.facebook.com/WeingartzLawnToSnow

https://twitter.com/Weingartz

http://pinterest.com/MrWeingartz

 

Sign up for our electronic monthly newsletter for discounts and money-saving tips.

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