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Performing Proper Engine Maintenance

Performing Proper Engine Maintenance

Maintenance is an unavoidable part of a landscaper’s job but is necessary to keep your fleet prepared for productivity and reduce downtime. Here are top maintenance tips to keep your engine in great condition to maintain productivity on jobsites.

Maintenance Tip # 1 – Evaluate Your Fleet

At the beginning and end of the season, check your equipment fleet and their engines. Examine the condition of those engines. Are they old and no longer performing properly or experiencing issues? Can these issues be resolved with proper maintenance or are they just related to old age? If so, it may be time to invest in a new engine or machine.

Maintenance Tip # 2 – Check Spark Plugs Regularly

Over time, spark plugs can become susceptible to carbon deposits and other damage that hinders your machine’s performance. Worn spark plugs can lead to stalling, difficulty starting, and engine misfires. Remove and inspect your engine’s spark plugs on a regular basis and replace them when necessary.

Maintenance Tip # 3 – Change Engine Oil Regularly

You know the importance of regular oil changes. Skipping oil changes can result in engine damage and relying on old oil can lead to lower engine performance and long-term damage. Make sure you understand the guidelines for your fleet’s engines. Knowing your engine’s oil-change intervals and sticking to them keeps your fleet running and working properly.

Maintenance Tip # 4 – Change Filters

Replace your machine’s oil filter, air filter, and fuel filter regularly.

Change the oil filter in your machine every time you change your oil. The oil filter is designed to remove as much debris as possible to help the engine run smoothly.

Air filters help prevent dirt and debris from getting into your machine’s engine. A dirty air filter can reduce air flow, while a clean air filter can improve engine performance and fuel efficiency.

For the fuel filter to help keep contaminants from entering the engine through the fuel line, replace it annually, after each season, or every 200 hours of operation.

Maintenance Tip # 5 – Use Proper Fuel

It goes without saying that your outdoor power equipment needs fuel to operate properly.  Since the engine in your OPE is only as good as the fuel you put in it, make sure you know the right type of fuel to use in your machine.

Engines produced for use in outdoor power equipment are not designed for gasoline with more than 10% ethanol. Using higher ethanol fuel blends can lead to engine damage and performance issues.

Ethanol-free gasoline with an octane rating of 87 or higher is generally a good fuel choice. Choosing the correct fuel for your engine is the best way to ensure proper performance and avoid engine issues and long-term damage.

Maintenance Tip # 6 – Store Your Equipment Properly

If you need to store your equipment for a significant amount of time, use a fuel stabilizer to combat stale fuel. As you know, fuel starts to go bad after 30 days so do not let it sit in your machine for longer than that. After 30 days, the volatile compounds in the fuel start evaporating, and this occurs whether the gas is in your outdoor power equipment or in the gas can.

As fuel sits and grows older, it evaporates and forms brown sticky deposits that eventually turn into a hard varnish. Deposits and varnish can plug fuel lines and passages in the carburetor, preventing the engine from running properly.

Fuel stabilizers separate and create a thin film on top of the fuel to keep out air and moisture. They also help prevent varnish buildup and can combat the corrosion.

Maintenance Tip # 7 – Use Propane

Consider using propane for your machines. In some cases, fueling with propane can offer benefits for your business. Propane eliminates some elements of operator error. For example, gas spillage can cause dead or brown spots. With propane, spill­age will never be an issue.

Fueling with propane can also help avoid fuel storage issues. Unlike fuel, propane isn’t susceptible to going stale, so your equipment can be stored with propane in it for long periods of time.

Lastly, using propane can impact your maintenance schedule by reducing the amount of time spent refueling. When your crew stops to refuel, that can add up to hours of lost productivity. With propane, you can easily refuel on the job.

Performing proper engine maintenance is essential to ensuring your fleet is up and running.

Why Weingartz?

Weingartz, family owned and operated, began in 1945 as a farm supply store for local Michigan families. In the 1970s, we began to focus exclusively on outdoor power equipment. Over time, we morphed into the “power equipment superstore” that now defines all of our locations. The staff and experts at Weingartz work diligently to provide the best service possible and give honest and helpful advice to each and every customer.

Weingartz also sells parts for all outdoor power equipment at https://weingartz.com/parts-lookup.

Weingartz
32098 Plymouth Road
Livonia, MI 48150
(734) 525-0980
info@weingartz.com

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How to Change the Spark Plug on a Honda Generator

How to Change the Spark Plug on a Honda Generator

Without a well-maintained spark plug, your generator won’t start. Bad spark plugs can cause issues for your machine, altering engine performance. You should check and/or replace the spark plug on your generator every year to ensure reliable starting and improve fuel economy. You can also check the spark plug every season or every 25 hours of use to determine whether it is time for a replacement.

Before performing any maintenance on your generator, refer to your owner’s manual for recommended maintenance and safety information. Maintenance instructions vary by model, so depending on your generator model our instructions may vary slightly.

Before performing any repair or maintenance on a generator, follow these safety precautions:

  • Turn fuel valve to off – prevents any spilling, any leakage or fire as the machine spills
  • Make sure machine is in the off position

To carry out this task, you’ll need these tools:

  • 5/8 socket
  • Ratchet
  • Extension

To change the spark plug on a Honda generator, you need to first access the spark plug. On some generator models, there is a panel on the top that can be removed. On other models, there is no panel to remove.

There is an ignition coil on the generator that goes into the cylinder. Pull the ignition coil up and it comes out very easily. Use your socket and extension to remove the spark plug.

Replace the old spark plug with a new one and tighten the spark plug down. Reinstall the ignition wire. Replace the top panel cover if necessary. Start the machine by turning the switch to the on position, choke, and give it a pull.

Too often, outdoor power equipment does not receive the maintenance it needs to keep operating properly. This is why it is important to know when and how to check and/or change the spark plug in your generator. Don’t neglect recommended maintenance, and do what needs to be done to keep your generator in the best condition possible.

You May Also Enjoy These Articles:

How to Change the Spark Plug on a Lawn Tractor

How to Change the Spark Plug on a Lawn Mower 

Spark Plug Maintenance 

How to Change the Air Filter in a Honda Generator

How to Change the Oil in a Honda Generator

Buyer’s Guide to a Portable Generator

Why Weingartz?

Weingartz, family owned and operated, began in 1945 as a farm supply store for local Michigan families. In the 1970s, we began to focus exclusively on outdoor power equipment. Over time, we morphed into the “power equipment superstore” that now defines all of our locations. The staff and experts at Weingartz work diligently to provide the best service possible and give honest and helpful advice to each and every customer.

Weingartz also sells parts for all outdoor power equipment at https://weingartz.com/parts-lookup.

Weingartz
39050 Grand River Ave.
Farmington Hills, MI 48335
(248) 471-3050
info@weingartz.com

Connect With Us!

https://plus.google.com

https://www.facebook.com/WeingartzLawnToSnow

https://twitter.com/Weingartz

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Learn More About Specific Honda Generator Models

Generator Operation and Safety Tips - EG Honda Generators Generator Operation and Safety Tips - EU Honda Generators Generator Operation and Safety Tips - EB Honda Generators Generator Operation and Safety Tips - EM Honda Generators

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    Shop Parts - How to Change the Spark Plug on a Honda Generator    Shop Equipment - How to Change the Spark Plug on a Honda Generator

How to Change the Spark Plug on a Lawn Tractor

How to Change the Spark Plug on a Lawn Tractor

Spark plugs should be replaced at least once a year of after 100 hours of use. Spark plugs provide an ignition source for your machine’s engine to power your lawn tractor. When spark plugs go bad, mowing your lawn becomes a challenge. For example, faulty spark plugs make your tractor difficult to start or cause your engine to die out quickly. Change the spark plug on your lawn tractor regularly to keep your mower up and running throughout the whole season.

Before performing any maintenance on your lawn tractor, refer to your owner’s manual for maintenance instructions and safety information. Maintenance instructions vary by model, so depending on your lawn mower model our instructions may vary slightly.

Before changing the spark plug on your mower, please abide by these safety precautions:

  • Shut off the engine
  • Allow the engine to become cool to the touch
  • Disconnect the spark plug wire to prevent accidental starting

To carry out this task, you’ll need these tools:

  • 5/8 deep well socket
  • Wrench
  • Extension

To change the spark plug on your lawn tractor, locate the spark plug on the side of the engine. Some tractor models have single-cylinder engines (with one spark plug) while others have twin-cylinder engines (with 2 spark plugs). Use your socket to loosen the spark plug. Loosen it and grab the spark plug on the end, and give it a couple more turns.

Install the new spark plug. Replace the old spark plug with a manufacturer approved replacement part (refer to your owner’s manual). Hold the spark plug on the end and stick it into the proper hole on the tractor. Turn the spark plug to the left to make sure that it is starting to thread in properly, but turn it to the right to tighten it.

Tighten the spark plug by hand. By doing this, you can tell if the threads are going in correctly and won’t strip the threads out of the head of the engine. Tighten as much as you can and then put your socket back on the spark plug to tighten it all the way down. Give it an extra snug turn.

If you are working with a twin-cylinder engine, repeat the same steps to change the spark plug on the other side of the machine. Once the spark plugs have been changed, reconnect the spark plug wire.

You’ll notice your engine running less smoothly if it has a broken or fouled spark plug. To keep your lawn tractor running smoothly, replace the spark plug when the time is right. Feel free to bring your tractor to our experts and they will replace the spark plug in no time.

You May Also Enjoy These Articles:

How to Change the Spark Plug on a Lawn Mower

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How to Change the Air Filter on a Lawn Mower

How to Change the Engine Oil in a Lawn Mower

Engine Maintenance Tips for Zero Turn Riders

How to Change the Deck Belt on a Riding Lawn Mower

Why Weingartz?

Weingartz, family owned and operated, began in 1945 as a farm supply store for local Michigan families. In the 1970s, we began to focus exclusively on outdoor power equipment. Over time, we morphed into the “power equipment superstore” that now defines all of our locations. The staff and experts at Weingartz work diligently to provide the best service possible and give honest and helpful advice to each and every customer.

Weingartz also sells parts for all outdoor power equipment at https://weingartz.com/parts-lookup.

Weingartz
11875 Northland Dr.
Cedar Springs, MI 49319
(616) 696-2913
info@weingartz.com

Connect With Us!

https://plus.google.com

https://www.facebook.com/WeingartzLawnToSnow

https://twitter.com/Weingartz

http://pinterest.com/MrWeingartz

Learn More About Brand Specific Lawn Mowers

John Deere Tractors Cub Cadet Tractors

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        Shop Parts - How to Change the Spark Plug on a Lawn Tractor    Shop Equipment - How to Change the Spark Plug on a Lawn Tractor

How to Change the Spark Plug on a Walk Behind Lawn Mower

How to Change the Spark Plug on a Walk Behind Lawn Mower

Lawn mowers run more efficiently with a new spark plug or one that’s fresh. If yours is bogged down by debris or worn out, it won’t be able to generate the spark needed to start your engine. A bad spark plug can also reduce the performance and fuel economy of your lawn mower. To keep your machine in working condition, check your spark plugs for wear and tear regularly and change them when necessary.

Before performing any maintenance on your lawn mower, refer to your owner’s manual for maintenance instructions and safety information. Maintenance instructions vary by model, so depending on your lawn mower model our instructions may vary slightly.

Before changing the spark plug on your mower, please abide by these safety precautions:

  • Shut off the engine
  • Allow the engine to become cool to the touch
  • Disconnect the spark plug wire to prevent accidental starting

To carry out this task, you’ll need these tools:

  • 5/8 spark plug socket
  • Extension
  • Ratchet

Begin by connecting the spark plug socket to the extension, and connect the extension to the ratchet to create one tool. Place this on the mower’s spark plug and turn it counter-clockwise to remove the spark plug from the head of the engine.

Check the gap on your new spark plug. Use a specialized gap tool or a set of feeler gauges to adjust the gap between the electrodes to the appropriate distance (refer to your owner’s manual for appropriate gap).

Install the new spark plug by hand. If you use the ratchet, you run the risk of cross threading, which will cause you to replace the entire head of the engine. Get the new plug finger tight. Use the spark plug socket, extension, and ratchet to tighten the spark plug a bit more.

Once the spark plug is snug, give it another half turn to make sure it has proper torque but do not over-tighten. Reconnect the ignition wire and you’re done.

Your lawn mower is like a car. It needs annual maintenance from oil changes and new air filters to fresh spark plugs. Since spark plugs corrode over time, make sure you stay on top of regular maintenance to keep your mower working effectively.

You May Also Enjoy These Articles:

How to Change the Air Filter on a Lawn Mower

How to Change the Engine Oil in a Lawn Mower

Lawn Mower Troubleshooting Tips

Buyer’s Guide to Walk Behind Lawn Mowers

Toro Walk Behind Lawn Mower Front Wheel Replacement

8 Best Practices for Effective Mowing

Why Weingartz?

Weingartz, family owned and operated, began in 1945 as a farm supply store for local Michigan families. In the 1970s, we began to focus exclusively on outdoor power equipment. Over time, we morphed into the “power equipment superstore” that now defines all of our locations. The staff and experts at Weingartz work diligently to provide the best service possible and give honest and helpful advice to each and every customer.

Weingartz also sells parts for all outdoor power equipment at https://weingartz.com/parts-lookup.

Weingartz
5436 Jackson Rd.
Ann Arbor, MI 48103
(734) 239-8200
info@weingartz.com

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https://www.facebook.com/WeingartzLawnToSnow

https://twitter.com/Weingartz

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Learn More About Brand Specific Lawn Mowers

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    Shop Parts - How to Change the Spark Plug on a Walk Behind Lawn Mower    Shop Equipment - How to Change the Spark Plug on a Walk Behind Lawn Mower

Lawn Mower Troubleshooting Tips

Lawn Mower Troubleshooting Tips

Any outdoor power equipment that is not properly cared for will have a shorter life and more and more problems, and your lawn mower is no exception. Your lawn mower is most likely the most frequently used piece of outdoor power equipment so perform the proper maintenance to maximize life and efficiency. Spring is upon us and that means it’s time to begin your yard maintenance. Here’s what to do when you’re ready to tackle yard work but your equipment isn’t.

Check spark plugs and carburetors

 Common problems that affect the starting and performance of your lawn mower are clogged air filters, fouled spark plugs, and flooded carburetors.

Replacing the spark plug can make a huge difference in the performance of your mower. We recommend that you change your spark plug every two years. To combat a flooded carburetor you need to drain the carburetor and put new fuel in it.

Utilize new fuel and air filters

Starting with fresh fuel and a clean air filter will help prevent lawn mower problems. To clean your air filter, tap it to remove lose debris. If you hold it to the light and see the light, it’s okay to use. If there is no light, replace it with a new air filter.

 Use fresh, mid-grade fuel with no higher than E10 Ethanol rating, stored in a clean, sealed container.

Keep a sharp lawn mower blade

Take a look at the lawn mower blade. A dull blade will not prevent your lawn mower from starting but it will affect your lawn.

Dull blades trim grass unevenly and leave the tips of your grass torn and not cleanly-sliced. Thus, a sharp blade eliminates many lawn issues. If your blade is dull, bring it into Weingartz to have it sharpened and balanced while you wait.

Check bolts, wheels, cables and belts

Tighten all bolts and check to make sure that the lawn mower wheels, cables and belts are not overly worn to avoid problems when you are mowing.

Keep up with routine maintenance

Staying on top of routine maintenance will increase the performance and life span of your lawn mower and all outdoor power equipment.

For regular maintenance, feel free to visit your local Weingartz where we have an entire team dedicated to making sure your equipment is running at its highest efficiency or visit Weingartz.com.

You May Also Enjoy These Articles:

How to Maintain the Perfect Home Landscape

Lawn Mower Maintenance

Does Lawn Mower Gasoline Expire?

6 Methods for Mulching

8 Best Practices for Effective Mowing

5 Lawn Mower Tune-up Tips for Spring

Why Weingartz?

Weingartz, family owned and operated, began in 1945 as a farm supply store for local Michigan families. In the 1970s, we began to focus exclusively on outdoor power equipment. Over time, we morphed into the “power equipment superstore” that now defines all of our locations. The staff and experts at Weingartz work diligently to provide the best service possible and give honest and helpful advice to each and every customer.

Weingartz also sells parts for all outdoor power equipment at https://weingartz.com/parts-lookup.

Weingartz
11875 Northland Dr.
Cedar Springs, MI 49319
(616) 696-2913
info@weingartz.com

Connect With Us!

https://plus.google.com

https://www.facebook.com/WeingartzLawnToSnow

https://twitter.com/Weingartz

http://pinterest.com/MrWeingartz

Learn More About Brand Specific Lawn Mowers

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    Types of grass    Shop Equipment

Spark Plug Maintenance

Spark-Plug-Maintenance - Featured Image

Just as a motor vehicle must undergo regular maintenance and upkeep, so must your outdoor power equipment. Regular maintenance keeps your machine running quietly and efficiently. If your lawn mower, snow blower, or other outdoor power equipment won’t start, a damaged spark plug may be the problem. Worn or dirty spark plugs can also cause issues for your machine, so be on the lookout for these as well. Read more to learn about  spark plug maintenance.

When to replace your spark plugs

As a rule of thumb, you should check and/or replace the spark plug on your small engine machine every year to ensure easy, reliable starting, and improve fuel economy. You may also check the spark plug every season or every 25 hours of use to determine whether it should be replaced. Lastly, if your outdoor power equipment won’t start, we recommend checking and/or replacing your spark plug.

How to check for a damaged spark plug

  • Turn your machine off and allow the engine to cool to the touch, and then disconnect the spark plug wire to prevent accidental starting.
  • Blow or clean off the area around the plug with compressed air or a brush, making sure the area is clean. This will prevent debris from getting in the combustion chamber when removing the spark plug.
  • Remove the spark plug with a spark plug socket and clean any deposits from the plug.
  • Use a wire brush or spray-on plug cleaner to remove the deposits, or a sturdy knife to scrape off tougher deposits.
  • Check the spark plug for cracked porcelain, electrodes that have been burned away, or stubborn deposits. If you find any of these issues, change the spark plug.
  • Check the spark plug gap and adjust if necessary. (While many manufacturers package new spark plugs with the cap pre-set, it is still a good idea to double-check the gap and torque according to the owner’s manual.)
  • If the spark plug is in good shape, re-attach. Make sure you don’t over-tighten the plug when replacing it.
  • Reconnect the spark plug wire and start your machine’s engine.

How to replace spark plugs

  • Disconnect the spark plug wire and clean the area around the spark plug.
  • Use a spark plug socket to remove the spark plug.
  • Check the gap on the new spark plug and replace it. Tighten the spark plug but don’t over-tighten it.
  • Reconnect the spark plug wire.

It is estimated that each Spring, over two-thirds of all lawn mowers do not receive the recommended maintenance. Knowing how to check and change your spark plugs is an important piece of information. Don’t fall behind on maintenance and do what needs to be done to keep your machine running properly all season long.

You May Also Enjoy These Articles:

Lawn Mower Maintenance

Toro Walk Behind Lawn Mower Front Wheel Replacement

How to Replace a Toro Walk Behind Mower Blade

How to Install a Briggs & Stratton Maintenance Kit

How to Replace a Cub Cadet 999ES Lawn Mower Blade

Why Weingartz?

Weingartz, family owned and operated, began in 1945 as a farm supply store for local Michigan families. In the 1970s, we began to focus exclusively on outdoor power equipment. Over time, we morphed into the “power equipment superstore” that now defines all of our locations. The staff and experts at Weingartz work diligently to provide the best service possible and give honest and helpful advice to each and every customer.

Weingartz
6585 Dixie Hwy.
Clarkston, MI 48346
(248) 620-5258
info@weingartz.com

Connect With Us!

https://plus.google.com

https://www.facebook.com/WeingartzLawnToSnow

https://twitter.com/Weingartz

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Learn More About Brand Specific Lawn Mowers

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    Types of grass    ShopEquipment

How to Install a Briggs & Stratton Maintenance Kit – Using Briggs & Stratton Part # 5140B

How-to-Install-Briggs-Stratton-Maintenance-Kit - Featured Image

Just as a motor vehicle must undergo regular maintenance and upkeep, so must your Toro walk behind lawn mower. A little maintenance goes a long way, but regular maintenance extends the life of your lawn mower. Regular maintenance is key to keeping your machine running quietly and efficiently. A Briggs and Stratton do-it-yourself maintenance kit is a handy, inexpensive kit to make the job extra convenient. Here’s how to install a Briggs and Stratton maintenance kit using Briggs & Stratton Part #5140B.

Before performing any repair or maintenance on a walk behind lawn mower, follow these safety precautions: shut off the lawn mower engine, allow the engine to become cool to the touch, and disconnect the spark plug wire to prevent accidental starting.

Change the spark plug

To carry out this task, you’ll need these tools: 13/16 spark plug socket, spark plug gapper, and Briggs and Stratton maintenance kit. This maintenance kit includes an air filter, spark plug, oil, and Briggs & Stratton stabilizer, which is specially made for ethanol protectant. This is especially important for today’s fuel with the ethanol they have does a number on the carburetors that they use in today’s machines. We recommend using the Briggs & Stratton ethanol protectant stabilizer. You can purchase along with the maintenance kit at any Weingartz location.

To install a Briggs & Stratton maintenance kit using Briggs & Stratton Part #5140B, disconnect the ignition wire, remove the spark plug and discard it. Check the spark plug gap before installing the new spark plug from the Briggs and Stratton maintenance kit. Briggs & Stratton recommends between .28 and .30 for a gap in this measurement.

When installing the new spark plug, thread it in by hand instead of with the ratchet. If you try to install it with the ratchet you will cross thread the head. Install the spark plug finger tight and tighten it down with the ratchet. Once it’s snug, give it a quarter turn to fully tighten down the spark plug. Reinstall the ignition wire and you’re done changing the spark plug on your lawn mower.

Replace the air filter

To replace the air filter on your Toro walk behind lawn mower you will only need a flathead screwdriver. Use the screwdriver to take the fastener off the front of the air filter cover. Pull the cover down and out of the way, and remove the old air filter. Inside the cover, there’s a foam pre cleaner that you should take out and clean with soap and water. If you need to clean the air filter do not use compressed air because you will rip the paper filter. If you need to clean the air filter out, simply tap it out and remove any bigger dirt or debris.

Once you’ve clean your pre filter with soap and water replace it along with the new air filter provided in the Briggs and Stratton maintenance kit. When installing the pre filter, there are two sides – there’s foam on one side and a grate on the other side. Put the grated side towards the outside of the air filter cover, away from the engine. Install that first. Make sure you clean the outside of the air filter cover and also anything on the inside of the filter to prevent it from getting sucked in the engine when you start your mower.

Insert the new air filter. When you do so, there’s a sealed side and an air filter side. The sealed side should face the engine and the plated air filter side should face away from the engine because that’s what’s going to catch all your dirt. Install the air filter, move the cover up and tighten it down with the flathead screwdriver. Once snug, you’ve successfully replaced the air filter on your lawn mower.

Change the oil

To change the oil on this Toro walk behind lawn mower, you don’t need any tools. It’s best to run the machine for 10 or 15 minutes to let the oil get warm. Once the oil is warm, shut your mower down and disconnect the spark plug wire.

Tip the mower on its side, but make sure the air filter side is up, which will put the dipstick side down. Remove the dipstick and tip the machine over a drain pan to catch all the old oil. Once the oil has drained into the oil pan, flip the mower back on its wheels and properly dispose of the used oil. To dispose of the oil, you can take it to a local auto parts store or Weingartz. We accept used oil for a small environmental charge.

Use the SAE 30 oil supplied in the tune-up kit from Briggs and Stratton. The kit comes with an 18 ounce bottle of oil that will properly fill your mower. Once the bottle is empty, clean the dipstick to make sure there’s no dirt or debris on it when you insert it in the mower’s engine. Lightly seat the dipstick, pull it back out and check the oil. The oil should be at the very top of the second dot on the dipstick. Reconnect the spark plug wire you’re done.

Again, regular maintenance is vital to longevity of your lawn mower. While installing a Brigss & Stratton maintenance kit is a seemingly simple task, if you are uncomfortable repairing the mower yourself, bring it to us and we’ll perform the maintenance is no time.

You May Also Enjoy These Articles:

Briggs & Stratton Tune-Up Kit

How to Replace a Toro Lawn Mower Wheel

How to Replace a Toro Lawn Mower Blade

Buyer’s Guide to Walk Behind Lawn Mowers

Does Lawn Mower Gasoline Expire?

Sea Foam Motor Treatment

Why Weingartz?

Weingartz, family owned and operated, began in 1965 as a farm supply store for local Michigan families. In the 1970s, we began to focus exclusively on outdoor power equipment. Over time, we morphed into the “power equipment superstore” that now defines all of our locations. The staff and experts at Weingartz work diligently to provide the best service possible and give honest and helpful advice to each and every customer.

Our inventory of Toro lawn mower parts is one of the widest in the industry, which allows us to offer quick response times and provide real images of many Toro parts to help you confidently make your selections. You can easily find replacement parts for your all your Toro equipment on our website or in our stores.

We ship all in-stock Toro lawn mower parts ordered by 4:00 p.m. EST the same day! Search Weingartz for diagrams, our Toro lawn mower parts catalog, and quick reference guides. We hope that you find our site useful and our customer service friendly and responsive to your Toro lawn mower parts needs. If there is anything we can do to enhance your experience or provide additional Toro parts support, please contact us and let us know. We appreciate any feedback and use it to continuously improve our business practices and the quality of our customer service.

Weingartz also sells parts for outdoor power equipment at https://weingartz.com/parts-lookup.

Weingartz
39050 Grand River Ave.
Farmington Hills, MI 48335
(248) 471-3050
info@weingartz.com

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https://www.facebook.com/WeingartzLawnToSnow

https://www.twitter.com/Weingartz

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Learn More About Brand Specific Lawn Mowers

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    6 Snow Blower Maintenance Tips - Shop Illustrated Diagrams    TORO PARTS WHEEL ASSEMBLY 115-2894 - Shop Equipment

5 Common Snow Blower Problems and Solutions

5 Common Snow Blower Problems and Solutions

Snow blower problem? We have the solution. Just as your motor vehicle needs regular maintenance and upkeep, so does your snow blower. Occasionally your snow blower will have an issue that a pre-snow tune-up or end-of-season repair won’t fix. It’s normal for your machine to have a hiccup every now and again. There may be times where multiple issues prevent your snow blower from functioning correctly.

Snow Blower Problem #1 – Snow Blower Not Starting

Defective spark plug. Check your spark plug for any deposits, cracks or other damage. If you have a spark tester, use it to see if the spark plug is working properly. You should see a strong spark if your spark plug is okay. If the spark plug is damaged or not getting a sufficient spark, it’s possible you need to replace the spark plug or you may also have a bad ignition coil.

Old fuel. Make sure there is no old fuel resting in your snow blower. If there is any old fuel drain it by disconnecting the fuel line between the fuel tank and carburetor. The gas from the fuel tank can then be drained into a drain pan and properly disposed. Any residual fuel in the carburetor should be drained by removing the carburetor bowl. Clean the bowl and replace the bowl gasket.

Clogged carburetor. A clogged carburetor is usually the result of leaving fuel in your snow blower for an extended period of time. Old fuel resting in your snow blower can also result in fuel evaporation, which may leave behind a thick, sticky substance. That sticky fuel can clog the carburetor and prevent the engine from starting. If your carburetor is clogged, clean it with carburetor cleaner. However if that is ineffective, you’ll need to rebuild or, in some cases, replace the entire carburetor.

Snow Blower Problem #2 – Not Blowing Snow

Build-up of snow. A build-up of snow in the discharge chute is a common snow blower problem. Snow build-up can prevent snow from blowing, so shut off your snow blower and clear any snow buildup in the chute. If the chute is clear, check the augers and auger drive system for problems.

Defective impeller. Your snow blower’s impeller propels snow through the chute. If the impeller is broken or jammed the snow blower won’t blow the snow. If your impeller is broken, replace it.

Worn scraper bar or paddles. This issue is common among single stage snow blowers. A worn scraper bar no longer clears snow as well as it did before. If this is the case with your snow blower it’s time to replace your scraper bar. If snow is going in and coming back out of your machine, it’s time to replace the paddles. Your snow blower paddles have wear indicator holes on them, making it easy to keep track of their wear. Look at the wear indicator holes, and when the rubber paddles are worn to the holes it is time to replace the paddles. Check the scraper bar for wear at this time. Paddles and scraper bars usually wear at the same rate so get in the habit of replacing both at the same time.

Snow Blower Problem #3 – Auger Not Turning

Broken shear pin or bolt. The shear pin and bolt fasten the augers to their drive shaft. They’re designed to break if your snow blower’s auger hits a large rock or chunk of ice to protect the engine from damage. If the shear pin or bolt breaks, the auger is unable to turn. Check to see if the pin or bolt is broken. If so, replace it.

Free Parts Lookup - Click HereDefective cogged or V-belt. The cogged belt or V-belt make the connection between the engine and gearbox. If either belt is damaged or broken your snow blower’s auger won’t turn. Inspect each belt for wear and tear, and if it is broken or worn out it should be replaced.

Damaged auger cable. If the auger cable on your snow blower is broken, the auger won’t turn. Inspect the auger cable; if it’s broken replace it.

Broken auger blades. Check the auger blades on your snow blower. If the blades are bent or damaged, replace them. If the auger assembly is worn, replace the entire thing.

Snow Blower Problem #4 – Leaking Gas

Dried out or missing carburetor gasket. If fuel is leaking from the bottom of the carburetor, the carburetor gasket may be dried out or missing. Try replacing the carburetor gasket. Another result of fuel leaking from the bottom of the carburetor is a dried out or missing carburetor bowl gasket. If that’s the case, replace the carburetor bowl gasket.

Damaged fuel filter. To solve this snow blower problem, check the connections to the fuel filter and the filter housing. If it is cracked don’t try to fix it. Instead, replace it completely. If any fuel lines are cracked, replace them as well. Additionally, check the fuel pump. Make sure the fuel lines and pulse line are tightly on the fuel pump, and check for cracks in the fuel pump.

Snow Blower Problem #5 – Wheels Not Turning

Replace wheel. Inspect the wheels of your snow blower before each use. If you spot a flat tire, repair or replace it. If the wheel rim is damage, you should replace it as well.

Defective cogged or V-belt. The cogged belt and V-belt make the connection between the engine and gearbox. If either belt is damaged or broken your snow blower’s wheels won’t turn. Inspect each belt for wear and tear, and if it is broken or worn out it should be replaced.

Defective drive disk. The drive disk has a rubber outer layer that grips and turns the drive plate. If this drive disk is worn or greasy it will slip and the drive plate won’t turn. As a result, your snow blower wheels won’t turn. Clean the drive disk if it is wet or greasy, but if it’s worn out replace it.

Broken cable control. Make sure that the control cable on your snow blower is not broken. Make sure the cable moves freely; if not apply a small amount of oil to the cable. If lubricating is ineffective, replace the control cable.

If you are unable to resolve your snow blower problems or just aren’t a DIY person, bring your machine to us and we’ll take care of the necessary maintenance and repairs. Our experts know that great service and regular maintenance are key to long-lasting equipment. They provide the best service to keep your snow blower running like new.

You May Also Enjoy These Articles:

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Why Weingartz?

Weingartz, family owned and operated, began in 1945 as a farm supply store for local Michigan families. In the 1970s, we began to focus exclusively on outdoor power equipment. Over time, we morphed into the “power equipment superstore” that now defines all of our locations. The staff and experts at Weingartz work diligently to provide the best service possible and give honest and helpful advice to each and every customer.

Weingartz also sells parts for all outdoor power equipment at https://weingartz.com/parts-lookup.

Weingartz
46061 Van Dyke Ave.
Utica, MI 48317
(586) 731-7240
info@weingartz.com

Connect With Us!

https://plus.google.com/+weingartz

https://www.facebook.com/WeingartzLawnToSnow

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Learn More About Brand Specific Snow Blowers

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18 Chainsaw Terms Every Homeowner Should Know

18 Essential Chainsaw Terms Every Homeowner Should Know - Weingartz Expert Advice

Have a new chainsaw or in the market for one? Familiarizing yourself with common chainsaw terms can help you choose the right machine, successfully operate your chainsaw, and even help pinpoint common maintenance and repair needs. Ready to get started? Check out our list below!


Air Filter
The air filter on your chainsaw keeps dirt, dust, and other debris from entering your chainsaw’s carburetor, which can negatively impact the engine and hinder performance if not properly maintained. Make sure to regularly clean or replace your air filter to ensure optimal performance and to prevent more costly repairs down the road.

Shop air filters here.


Anti-Vibration System
The anti-vibration system is designed to reduce excessive vibration while your chainsaw is in motion, providing better operator comfort and helping to prevent injuries from continual use. Anti-vibration technology is made possible by the addition of metal springs and rubber bushes, which provide suspension.

Shop springs and bushes here.


Bar (also: Blade or Guide Bar)
The chainsaw bar or blade is the long, metal part of your chainsaw that the chain moves around to make cuts. Chainsaw bars typically range in length from 8 to 20 inches, with shorter bars being designed for homeowners and professional arborists. Longer bars are typically used by farmers or professionals who work with larger trees.

Shop replacement bars and chains here.


Carburetor
A chainsaw’s carburetor is responsible for mixing the correct amount of fuel and air to keep the engine performing at its best. Issues with the carburetor can cause smoking, stalling, or prevent the engine from running.  If you are having issues with your carburetor, a repair or rebuild may be necessary.

Shop carburetor parts here or schedule service here.


Centrifugal Clutch
As the engine RPM increases through the throttle response, the centrifugal clutch engages to move the chain around the bar. The centrifugal clutch also keeps the chain from moving while the chainsaw is idling. This helps to prevent injury while the operator is not actively using the chainsaw to make cuts.

Chainsaw not working properly? Shop replacement parts here.


Chain (also: Saw Chain)
Undoubtedly one of the most important parts of the chainsaw, the chain is what rotates around the bar to make cuts. The chain is made up of several sharp, steel cutting teeth and must be regularly sharpened to ensure proper performance.

Shop replacement chains here.


Chain Brake
The chain brake is an important safety feature that automatically stops the chain from moving if kickback occurs during operation. The chain brake can also be manually activated in case of other emergency situations or may be used as a safety precaution between cuts.

Learn more about chainsaw safety here.

Chain Catcher
The chain catcher catches the chain in the event that it breaks or flies off your chainsaw during use. This helps prevent injury to the operator.

Learn what types of safety gear you should wear while operating a chainsaw here.


Fuel Filter
The fuel filter keeps dirt and debris (that can get in through the fuel lines) from reaching the carburetor. Having a clean fuel filter in your chainsaw is essential to keeping foreign objects from clogging your carburetor and causing operational problems.

Find fuel filters here.


Fuel Line
The fuel line is a tube through which fuel moves on its way from the fuel tank to the carburetor. Find replacement fuel line here.


Kickback
When your saw chain hits an extremely hard object or catches on what you’re cutting, you may experience kickback. Chainsaw kickback is a dangerous action where the chainsaw flies up toward the operator, often resulting in severe injury or death. Because kickback cannot always be predicted, it is extremely important to use a chainsaw with a chain brake safety feature and always wear the proper safety gear while operating your chainsaw.

Find 5 important chainsaw safety tips here.


Oil Filter
Your chainsaw’s oil filter keeps foreign sediments from contaminating the oil. This helps keep moving parts lubricated, optimizing the performance of your chainsaw.

Shop replacement oil filters here.

Pre-Mixed Fuel
You can simplify the fuel and oil mixing process for your chainsaw by using pre-mixed fuel (available from several top manufacturers like STIHL, Echo, and RedMax). Find pre-mixed fuel here.


Rear Handle Chainsaw
A rear handle chainsaw includes two handles—one on the front and one on the back of your machine. The two handles are spaced apart for better handling while cutting. If you are looking for a lighter weight chainsaw for in-tree arbor use, you should instead use a top handle chainsaw.

Not sure which chainsaw is right for you? View our chainsaw buyer’s guide here.

Scabbard

The scabbard is a cover that’s placed over the chainsaw bar to protect the chain from damage while in storage or during transport. The scabbard also helps to protect the operator from accidental injuries during transport. Find a scabbard here.


Spark Plug
The spark plug ignites the fuel and air mixture in your chainsaw to create energy that powers your machine. Spark plugs should be replaced after every 100 hours of use to ensure proper performance.

Learn more about replacing spark plugs and storing your small engine equipment for winter here.

Throttle and Throttle Lock

The throttle is responsible for adjusting the amount of fuel that reaches the engine, which in turn determines how quickly the chainsaw moves. The throttle lock is designed to simultaneously activate with the throttle to prevent accidental throttle changes during use.

Find throttle cables here.

Top Handle Chainsaw
A top handle chainsaw is designed for working in trees or other high-up places where a rear handle chainsaw would be difficult to carry. Top-handled chainsaws are commonly used by arborists and other professionals.

Shop top-handle chainsaws here.

Have questions or looking for more chainsaw terms? Watch our video buyer’s guide here or check out our chainsaw safety guide for tips to help you prevent chainsaw-related injuries.

 

You May Also Enjoy These Articles:

Buyer’s Guide To Chainsaws

Chainsaw Chain Brake Inspection

Winter Chainsaw Safety: 5 Tips For Injury Prevention

5 Chainsaw Maintenance Tips

How To Replace The Chain On A Chainsaw

6 Ways To Prepare For Winter Storms

About Weingartz

Weingartz is the trusted North American leader in sales and service of outdoor power equipment. Our loyal residential and commercial customers come back to Weingartz again and again because of the outstanding knowledge, expertise and value they receive. To learn more about what  Weingartz sells and services, visit https://www.weingartz.com.  Weingartz also sells parts for outdoor power equipment at https://weingartz.com/parts-lookup.

Connect With Us!

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Snow Blower Tune-Up Checklist

Snow Blower Tune-up Checklist

Snow Blower Tune-Up Checklist- Do It Yourself or Bring Your Snow Blower in for Expert Service

Every year, your snow blower needs a tune-up. A snow blower tune-up is slightly different for single stage snow blowers, two stage snow blowers and three stage snow blowers. If you are a Do It Yourself person, below is a snow blower tune-up checklist and links to parts that you may need. If you are not very handy or simply don’t have the time, we would be happy to help you with your Snow Blower Tune-Up Checklist. You can bring your snow blower in to one of our stores in Michigan or give the store closest to you a call and we can pick it up for you. Whatever you decide, use this snow blower tune-up checklist to make sure your machine is winter-ready.

Single Stage Snow Blower Tune-Up Checklist

* Flush fuel system

* Install new spark plug

* Rebuild carburetor

* Check and adjust RPM

* Check compression

* Check and adjust belts

* Lubricate and adjust bail cable (if applicable)

* Check Paddles for wear

* Check scraper bar for wear

* Inspect and test all safety features

* Power wash unit

* Test overall operation of unit

 * Watch video on how to replace Paddles & Scraper Bars

 

Two and Three Stage Snow Blower Tune-Up Checklist

* Change engine oil

* Flush fuel system

* Install new spark plug

* Rebuild carburetor

* Check and adjust RPM

* Check compression

* Test ignition system

* Check and adjust belts

* Check transmission fluid

* Lubricate and adjust cables

* Check scraper bar for wear

* Inspect and test all safety features

* Power wash unit

* Test overall operation of unit

  * Watch video on how to replace Paddles & Scraper Bars

 

The most common parts that you will need for a snow blower tune-up checklist include: a spark plug, a carburetor kit, a primer bulb, and a paddle & scraper bar kit. In order to locate the snow blower tune-up parts that you need, use our Snow Blower Quick Reference Guide or Search Illustrated Parts Diagrams.

 You May Also Enjoy These Articles: 

Snow Blower Safety: 6 Tips For Homeowners

Snow Blowers Buyer’s Guide

6 Snow Blower Maintenance Tips

Everyone Needs a Snow Blower: 8 Tips for Michiganders

5 Common Snow Blower Problems and Solutions

Buyer’s Guide to Paddles and Scraper Bars

Why Weingartz?

Weingartz, family owned and operated, began in 1945 as a farm supply store for local Michigan families. In the 1970s, we began to focus exclusively on outdoor power equipment. Over time, we morphed into the “power equipment superstore” that now defines all of our locations. The staff and experts at Weingartz work diligently to provide the best service possible and give honest and helpful advice to each and every customer.

Weingartz
46061 Van Dyke Ave.
Utica, MI 48317
(586) 731-7240
info@weingartz.com

Connect With Us!

https://plus.google.com/+weingartz

https://www.facebook.com/WeingartzLawnToSnow

https://www.twitter.com/Weingartz

http://pinterest.com/MrWeingartz

https://www.youtube.com/user/WeingartzLawnToSnow

Learn More About Brand Specific Snow Blowers

6 Snow Blower Maintenance Tips - Honda-Snow-Blowers-Page6 Snow Blower Maintenance Tips - Toro-Snow-Blowers-Page6 Snow Blower Maintenance Tips - Cub-Cadet-Snow-Blowers-Page


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    Snow Blower Tune-Up Checklist    Snow Blower Tune-Up Checklist - Shop Equipment